LCAS Partners

Please complete your details below to join the Manager’s Whatsapp Group.

The group will be managed by Dudley Sawyerr of People Care Services & Whitworth Care, working with LCAS.

Your details will not be shared with anyone outside the individual group.

Please note that on joining the group, your number will be visible to all parties participating.

The group has been created for regulation updates, sharing of information, events and to seek help from your fellow care managers.

 

Any questions please contact dudley@peoplecareservices.com or 07403010207

 

PLEASE PRINT YOUR NAME AND NUMBER CLEARLY

STATE YOUR BOROUGH: CROYDON (C)   WANDSWORTH (W)  NW & TRI (TRI)

NAME MOBILE NUMBER ORGANISATION BOROUGH

 

Whatsapp Groups: The Golden Rules

  • Always keep to the purpose of the group! Don’t share irrelevant messages about other topics.
  • The aim of the group is to provide a platform to support sharing information, if you need advice or an update please ask admin or relevant person in the group.
  • Don’t be offended if others leave. Not everyone wants the same information.
  • Do not have one-on-one conversations in the group. Switch to private messages.
  • Please try not to post between 22:00 and 07:00 unless is necessary.
  • If someone asks a question and you don’t know the answer don’t respond with “I don’t know”. Just wait for someone who knows the answer to reply.
  • If someone asks a question of a personal nature (like asking for advice) don’t respond if someone else has already answered, or else respond to the person directly in a private message.
  • The group is not a political platform, No arguing, no heated opinions, no fear mongering, no fake news. Check your sources before you share.
  • Never EVER use a group to berate someone else or air grievances. If you have an issue address it, one on one with the relevant person.
  • Don’t ask to add random people to group. Always ask admin if you may want to add them

 


Health &Safety in The News.

Following the disastrous fire at Notre Dame, concerns around H&S have been raised. See the Citation link below for more information

https://www.citation.co.uk/news/health-and-safety/the-notre-dame-fire-reflections-on-health-safety-during-construction-work-for-businesses/?utm_source=emailmarketing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=partner_newsletter_april_19&utm_content=2019-04-26

HSE to increase Fee for Invention (FFI) by nearly 20%

From 6 April 2019, the HSE increased the FFI. The new hourly fee of £154 means businesses have to dig deep into their pockets if they’re found to breach Health & Safety laws. But don’t panic; here’s everything you need to know.

http://clicks.citationltd.co.uk/email/S-4707@60668@XgxsCtqLFn0JJ73sFi6jb7OlJNDFT3UQpmJy-S3MgX8.@

How is freedom of movement going to change after Brexit? 

With the free movement of EU nationals in the UK (and vice versa) due to come to end, here’s what your business needs to know.

http://clicks.citationltd.co.uk/email/S-4707@60668@XgxsCtqLFn0JJ73sFi6jb7OlJNDFT3UQpmJy-S3MgX8.@

Four businesses with innovative approaches to employee well-being

To mark stress awareness month, we’ve delved into ways that four businesses are proactively supporting employees’ well-being.

http://clicks.citationltd.co.uk/email/S-4707@60670@XgxsCtqLFn0JJ73sFi6jb7OlJNDFT3UQpmJy-S3MgX8.@

Citation also have a new Employee Assistance Programme, developed with BUPA, this gives you the ability to provide confidential mental health and wellbeing support for your valuable staff team.

 


 

 

LOCAL AUTHORITY INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS

Local Authorities are a significant source of work for many homecare providers throughout the UK. If Local Authority contracts are to be awarded and maintained, then it is important that providers can meet the various Authorities’ requirements. It should be noted that the requirements can vary significantly between Local Authorities and if there are any concerns then these should firstly be raised with the insurance broker that you work with.

Many Authorities send out a form for completion and return on an annual basis to ensure you have the correct insurance cover in place. Often, these are to be completed by the broker rather than the provider. Even if this is not the case, we would recommend sending these to your broker for review to ensure you appreciate any terms you may be expected to comply with. Authorities which ask for disproportionately high amounts of cover can increase the cost of providers’ insurance premiums. Providers should therefore consider drawing excessive requirements to council’s attention during tender processes.

Here is a summary of some of the requirements Towergate have come across in the many years they have been providing insurance and risk management solutions to the UK social care sector.

EMPLOYERS LIABILITY

This is the most common requirement and provides cover for employees who are injured whilst at work. The usual limit required is £10m, which is a standard limit provided by insurance policies.

PUBLIC LIABILITY

This covers injury to third parties (service users and members of the public) and damage to third party property for which the provider is legally liable. The required limits range from £2m to £10m. Most policies provide a limit of £5m as standard. Increased limits can be obtained through a variety of methods and we would recommend contacting your broker in the first instance. However, Towergate insurance have recognised the need for homecare providers to have between £5m to £10m indemnity, so they supply a policy with a £10m limit as standard.

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE

This provides cover for injuries caused by medical errors, including the maladministration of drugs and medicines. Some providers will ask for this cover only if nursing care is provided. The Towergate policy includes this for all clients.

 

PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY

Professional Indemnity (commonly known as “PI”) provides cover for purely financial losses as a result of services rendered. The type of organisations who usually have this cover are accountants, insurance brokers, architects etc. who provide professional advice services. Many Local Authorities get confused between this and Medical Malpractice cover. It should be noted however, that there are circumstances that this could be suitable for a homecare provider, if for example, training is provided to external candidates, especially if a fee is charged. In addition, if a benefits application is completed incorrectly on someone’s behalf, there is potential for a purely financial loss to be incurred.

These are just some of the key points that Local Authorities look to homecare providers to adhere to with their insurances. If you have any queries regarding these or another part of your policy, you can contact Towergate for their advice.

Legal support

Towergate work with their clients to provide them with the right insurance for their needs and with their domiciliary care product they also provide a care specific legal tool called Markel Law Hub which provides users with access to an online portal that contains a range of different legal documents including a staff hand book and solutions to a variety of HR and business issues you may face. This is backed up with a 24-hour legal helpline.

Towergate Insurance is a homecare insurance specialist. They provide a range of insurance products and proactive risk management tools that help homecare businesses operate smoothly. For more information on how Towergate can support you, please visit www.towergateinsurance.co.uk or call them on 0330 123 5172.

Simon Shaw | Business Development Executive | Caring Professions Division |

Towergate Insurance Brokers | www.towergateinsurance.co.uk

M: 07483 930205 | E: simon.shaw@towergate.co.uk

Kings Court, London Road, Stevenage SG1 2GA

Towergate and Towergate Insurance are trading names of Towergate Underwriting Group Limited. Registered Office: Towergate House, Eclipse Park, Sittingbourne Road, Maidstone, Kent, ME14 3EN. Authorised and Regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

 


CQC have published new guidance on Relationships and Sexuality in Adult Social Care

services.

This summary guidance is designed to raise awareness amongst inspectors and providers, of the sexuality related needs of people using adult social care services. The guidance highlights the importance of supporting people to form and maintain relationships, and considers circumstances where some people may be at risk of harm.

The definition of sexuality within the guidance is deliberately broad to try and capture the range of different experiences people may have. It is designed to support inspectors and providers to sensitively navigate this complex area in a practical way, to promote the best experiences for people. There is information at the end of the guidance to signpost readers to further information and support.

The link to the guidance itself is below, and it is available on the provide guidance section of our website and a story will be added to the news page.

20190221 Relationships and sexuality in social care_PUBLICATION

Foe further information, or queries, please conntact you CQC inspector.


The latest from the Social Care Institute for Excellence

Lots of useful information and webinars, great for your CPD.

https://www.scie.org.uk/?utm_campaign=10299948_SCIELine%2019%20Feb%202019&utm_medium=email&utm_source=SCIE&utm_sfid=003G000002HpREMIA3&utm_role=Director&dm_i=4O5,64RHO,K6B8Y9,O3QNO,1


57% of care homes in London recently inspected by the London Fire Brigade have failed

important fire safety checks*and had to be given formal notifications to address fire

safety issues. The London Fire Brigade identified several key areas of weakness:

  • Fire risk assessments were being carried out by people who did not have the proper skills and experience. All risk assessments must be carried out by someone with the relevant level of competence, which the Health and Safety Executive define as

the combination of training, skills, experience and knowledge that a person has and their ability to apply them to perform a task safely”

This is particularly relevant to the Fire Brigade’s finding that 45% of the fire risk assessments they inspected were not suitable or not sufficiently comprehensive*. A fire risk assessment provides no protection against fire on its own. Protection comes from identifying the required fire safety controls and corrective actions through the assessment, implementing them and maintaining them. This cannot be done without a sufficient knowledge of fire safety.

  • One in three premises did not have adequate fire doors or had poorly maintained fire doors. Fire doors are an essential part of a fire compartmentation system, and they must be maintained in good working order and used properly in order to prevent the spread of fire. A fire compartmentation system works by dividing a building into multiple fire-resistant compartments, so that if a fire starts in one area it will be contained. Fire doors allow people to move between compartments without compromising the compartment system, which should offer at least 30 minutes of protection before a fire is able to burn through the fire door and get into the next compartment.

In a building with many compartments, this system will dramatically slow the spread of fire and allow plenty of time for the emergency services to arrive. This system is also the basis for the common “phased evacuation” system, where vulnerable or immobile residents are evacuated in stages as the fire draws closer to their location. However, a fire door that is damaged or inadequate will not provide the same level of protection and the fire will spread to the next compartment much faster. In the worst cases, where the fire door is jammed or propped open, there will be no protection at all and the fire can spread immediately into the next compartment.

  • There was “widespread confusion” about fire evacuation plans. All staff need to be aware of the fire evacuation plans for their care home and trained in any evacuation tasks that they need to carry out. This is particularly important in care homes with vulnerable or immobile residents who are unable to evacuate themselves, or in care homes with phased evacuation plans.

If you feel that your business would benefit from a free 90-minute review from our strategic Health and Safety partner Ellis Whittam, please

call Simon Shaw on 07483 930205 or

email simon.shaw@towergate.co.uk

*Safety & Health Practitioner publication

Published 5/2/2019
/www.london-fire.gov.uk/media/3443/report-on-auditing-of-care-homes-by-london-fire-brigade.pdf

 


Missing People

London is a large city, with much open space and an ageing population, ofetn citzens go missing and need to be quickly found. The Met Police have the Herbert Protocol and work with Lowland Rescue to facilitate this, details are below. This is particularly useful data for those of you working in areas of social care such as dom care

The Herbert Protocol

https://www.met.police.uk/herbertprotocol

this is a great presentation about the workings of the rescue team

London Resilience VSP – Youtube


BREXIT

Below is a letter from the Department of Health with regard to preparations for a “no-deal” Brexit situation.

Department of Health Providers Letter

 


How to find and contact your MP

This website will provide all the information you need to be able to contact your MP and then tell then about the state of social care

https://www.parliament.uk/get-involved/contact-your-mp/

You can also tweet your MP

https://tweetyourmp.com/

How to find and contact local Councillors

Remember, they need your votes!

Look on any council website, as examples

Croydon

https://democracy.croydon.gov.uk/mgMemberIndex.aspx?bcr=1

Wandsworth

http://www.wandsworth.gov.uk/info/200438/councillors/441/find_a_councillor

Hammersmith

http://democracy.lbhf.gov.uk/mgMemberIndex.aspx?bcr=1


The Motor Neurone Disease Association

recently presented at an LCAS event. Their contact details and information are below.

mnda infomation & contacts

Heather St Louis

T: 03453 751826

M: 07760 624657

E: heather.stlouis@mndassociation.org

The Association has leaflets and a helpline and can advise social care organisations


New ways of working in adult social care services

The Care Provider Alliance’s publication “New ways of working in adult social care services” has been published today. It can be downloaded from www.careprovideralliance.org.uk/new-ways-of-working.

The CPA  is keen to receive as much feedback from providers as possible via www.careprovideralliance.org.uk/feedback. A final report, reflecting feedback received by Friday 8th March 2019, will be published in the spring.

Social media shares would be welcomed and if you could add the hashtag #CareProviderAlliance, it would be very much appreciated


Nursing Associates new CQC guidance

From 28 January 2019, nursing associates can apply for registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). To accompany this, CQC have  published a briefing for providers on the new role of nursing associate.

You can view this on CQC website

The briefing note includes:

  • links to guidance about this new role and what it means for services
  • what to be aware of under the Health and Social Care Act and specific regulated activities
  • how CQC will consider the new role in our inspection and regulation.

National Recruitment Campaign for adult social care

A social care National Recruitment Campaign led by the Department of Health & Social Care is being launched on February 11th and will run until early April. The aim is to raise awareness of careers in care and encourage people with the right values to work in care to apply for jobs in this sector. There’s going to be TV and radio adverts, press articles, posters in public places (e.g. bus stops) and also a social media campaign. Anyone interested in finding out more will be directed to a website which gives further information about careers in care and which signposts to local vacancies http://www.everydayisdifferent.com

To make the most of the campaign and use it to support their own recruitment, social care employers are encouraged to:

  1. Advertise vacancies online. The campaign will be directing people to the Department for Work & Pensions Find a Job site which is filtered to show Social Care jobs only . Make sure potential recruits know about your job vacancies by advertising on this site. See instructions below and there are also videos to explain the process:
  2. Become a case study. The Department for Health & Social Care is looking for people to feature in case studies about working in care – to potentially feature on the campaign Facebook page or to be shared through the press or other social media. Anyone who’s interested in taking part should e-mail: casestudies@morecarejobs.co.uk
  3. Raise awareness of the campaign via social media. A campaign Facebook page has been set-up: http://www.facebook.com/everydayisdifferent. During the campaign this will include case studies, photos, promotional blogs and information. You can raise awareness of the campaign by liking the page, sharing the content, sharing your experiences of working in care – and encouraging colleagues to do the same so we can reach as many people as possible. Use the campaign hashtags #everydayisdifferent #workincare
  4. Make use of the toolkit and resources. A toolkit with advice and information will be available on the website from Feb 11th for employers to use. Look under the resources section of http://www.everydayisdifferent.com

Two new quizzes will be available (could you care? and how well do you know yourself?) and you can share them using #shareifyoucare

  1. Keep in touch with local activities. You can keep updated by visiting the Skills for Care website: National Recruitment Campaign. Your Locality Manager may know of local activities you can get involved in

What is an expert by experience?

CQC Experts by Experience are people who have personal
experience (in the last 5 years) of using or caring for
someone who uses health, mental health and/or social
care services that the CQC regulates.

For more information, see the link below

citation faq expert by experience

What is Healthwatch?

Healthwatch is the independent consumer watchdog for
Health and Social Care in England.
There are approximately 150 local Healthwatch
organisations and Healthwatch England at national level.

For more information, see the link below

citation faq local healthwatch

 


Helpful items from Citation for the New Year

 

Braced for Brexit? Here’s the roadmap you need…

From myth busting to practical downloads to help you action changes, our Brexit hub will help you navigate your businesses way through Brexit over the next few months:

Link: https://www.citation.co.uk/brexit?utm_source=partner&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_campaign=jan19

 

Five innovative ways to communicate your 2019 strategy to your team

How do you get your team to be as enthusiastic about this year’s plans as you are? Read our 5 easy-to-achieve ways to effectively communicate your strategy to the whole team:

Link: www.citation.co.uk/news/hr-and-employment-law/five-innovative-ways-to-communicate-your-2019-strategy-to-your-team/?utm_source=partner&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_campaign=jan19

 

45 things you need to know about fire

Did you know all these things about fire? Read up – we can almost guarantee there will be something new for you to learn:

Link:www.citation.co.uk/news/health-and-safety/45-things-you-need-to-know-about-fire/?utm_source=partner&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_campaign=jan19

 

On the road in the cold: safety tips for employees

Whether it’s for their commute or part of their job, if your employees are on the road you should be communicating certain safety practices. Watch our short video to find out more:

Link: www.citation.co.uk/news/health-and-safety/on-the-road-in-the-cold-safety-tips-for-employees/?utm_source=partner&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_campaign=jan19

 

Employee fatalities: how to handle the unthinkable

We’ve taken a step-by-step look at what you need to do – and when – if you find yourself facing an employee fatality.

Link: www.citation.co.uk/health-and-safety/health-and-safety-policies/employee-fatalities-how-to-handle-the-unthinkable/?utm_source=partner&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_campaign=jan19

 

Banter: what do you do when it goes too far?

The word ‘banter’ is thrown about a lot these days, but one person’s banter can be another person’s bullying. Here’s what to do if the line is crossed.

Link: www.citation.co.uk/news/hr-and-employment-law/banter-what-do-you-do-when-it-goes-too-far/?utm_source=partner&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_campaign=jan19


Skills for care

Have asked for these two recently developed guides on the Assessment and Development of literacy, numeracy and spoken communication skills to be made available. For more information, please contact your SfC Locality Manager

SfC L& N for job profiles

SfC assessment & development of LNSC skills

 


Preparing for Brexit

These items are the national operational guidance for health and social care for EU exit.

EU Exit operational readiness guidance cover letter

EU Exit Operational Readiness Guidance


Preparing for Brexit

None of us know what will be happening from April next year but providers are being urged providers to think about their Brexit contingency.

Travel might be a challenge if lorries block motorways queuing at ports. Are we supporting our EU staff to gain settled status? Have we talked to our suppliers about access to essential supplies?

Your EU workforce are now able to apply for and gain their settled or pre-settled status, so please do pass this link to anyone who qualifies. We want as many of our EU Health and Social Care workers to stay after the UK leaves the EU, and your assistance in helping us achieve this is greatly appreciated.

https://apply-for-eu-settled-status.homeoffice.gov.uk/start/eu-settlement

New, 3 November 2018 — Open consultation immigration Migration Committee

Shortage occupation list 2018: call for evidence

We are seeking evidence from stakeholders to help inform our review of the shortage occupation list.

Deadline is the 6th January and you can comment on line

 

 


Social care pressures reflected in Ombudsman’s annual review of complaints

“It’s no longer just one-off mistakes; we’re seeing problems with systems, policies and the way procedures are being applied…”

That’s the view of Michael King, Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman, as the service launches its annual review of adult social care complaints.

Over the past year, the Ombudsman has become increasingly concerned about the way some authorities are handling the need to balance the pressures they are under with the way they assess and charge for care.

The report, which looks at the data behind every adult social care complaint the Ombudsman has received over the 12-month period, shows there has been a nine per cent increase in complaints about charging. And of those complaints, it is upholding 67% – higher than the average uphold rate for adult social care of 62%, and greater still than the 57% uphold rate for all complaints the Ombudsman investigates.

To reda the reposr, please use the link below

ASC Review FINAL

 


About Mobile Care Monitoring from Person Centred Software www.personcentredsoftware.com

Mobile Care Monitoring is an intelligent mobile solution for evidencing care interactions, electronic care planning and reporting from Person Centred Software.

Our solution enables care homes in the UK to evidence care as it happens with our icon-driven app. Our solution reduces paperwork and gives carers more time to care, improving care quality and the care cycle overall.

Supporting CQC inspections, including the new technology KLOEs, we help providers to be recognised for innovative, transparent and person-centred care.

Our philosophy is person-centred; providing benefits to everyone involved in care by delivering exceptional tools.

Contact us on hello@personcentredsoftware.com or 01483 604108 to request a demo.


Evidence for “significant and sustainable reform of adult social care is overwhelming” says VODG as it welcomes

LGA green paper findings

VODG welcomes the Local Government Association’s analysis following its own green paper, ‘the lives we want to lead’, as an important step forward in keeping reform and funding of social care high on the agenda.

Commenting on the implications from the LGA’s consultation process VODG chief executive Dr Rhidian Hughes said:

“The evidence for significant and sustainable reform of adult social care is overwhelming and today’s report from the LGA is a welcome contribution. We need central government leaders to work together, cross-party, to give the millions of older and disabled people who rely on essential services certainty about the care and support they are entitled to receive.”

Rhidian Hughes goes on:

“It is time now for central government to act. The often talked of, but never seen, green paper, should be brought forward without further delay.”

VODG described the Autumn Budget settlement as “short sighted” with the financial plans leaving the sector perilously under-funded and people unable to access services and support. VODG believes that central government can put things right through the Local Government Finance Settlement.

VODG’s report, A stitch in time: the case for funding social caresets out the financial pressures in the system and a number of recommendations for government.


www.socialworksltd.co.uk Training offer

Following the success of our first open sessions, we’ve arranged the following new dates for employers

Level 3 Award in Awareness of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (RQF) – (1 day, 10-5)

Mon 26 Nov – 10am till 5pm at Peckham Levels (5 mins from Peckham Rye station)

Covering the essentials of the Mental Capacity Act and DoLS this is a great course for staff working in all areas of adult social care, especially seniors, co-ordinators, managers etc. The course is run by Social Works Ltd, and quality assured and certificated by TQUK Awarding Body.

The cost is just £36 (inc £6 VAT) plus the WDF claim value for the course of £60 per learner. Please note the £36 deposit /employer contribution is non refundable. If your candidate attends but for any reason fails to complete the course, you may still be required to pay the additional £60 WDF claim value that their successful completion would have generated too.

Level 2 Certificate in Understanding the Safe Handling of Medicines (RQF) & Care Certificate Knowledge  – 10am till 5pm at Peckham Levels (5 mins from Peckham Rye station)

PERFECT FOR NEW STAFF – A GREAT QUALITY FUNDED OPTION. No deposit – both courses funded entirely by the WDF claim value of the L2 Medication course.

Sessions running…

Mon 12- Thurs 15 Nov – 10am-5pm each day

Thur 29, Fri 30 Nov & Mon 3, Tue 4 Dec – 10am-5pm each day
Thur 10, Fri 11 & Mon 14, Tue 15 Jan – 10am-5pm each day

Over 4 days your new recruits cover both the Care Certificate (Knowledge)* and the Skills for Care funded, nationally recognised, Level 2 Certificate in Understanding the Safe Use of Medicines (RQF). Taught by experienced and qualified trainers from Social Works Ltd with extensive adult social care experience.

Your new staff get top quality training – you get certificates and workbook evidence for inspections and quality assurance, covering not just the Care Certificate*, but also the Level 2 Certificate in Understanding the Safe Use of Medicines – a much more in-depth and nationally accredited alternative or supplement to your usual inhouse medication training.

At the end of their training your learners will have:
• 2 comprehensive comprehensive completed workbooks demonstrating their knowledge.
• A certificate from TQUK Awarding Body for the Level 2 Certificate in Understanding the Safe Use of Medicines
• A certificate from Social Works Ltd confirming their completion of their Care Certificate (Knowledge) training for 14 of the 15 standards as above.

*Please note the 4 days funded training covers the Level 2 Certificate in Understanding the Safe Use of Medicines (RQF), as well as all the Care Certificate Knowledge Standards except Basic Life Support, which you can either cover inhouse, or Social Works Ltd can do it for you over an additional ½ day training which you will need to contact them directly to arrange). 

To book and for further details, please contact John Buttle at Social Works: Mob: 07968 195 491. E john.buttle1@btinternet.com or john@socialworksltd.co.ukwww.socialworksltd.co.uk


CQC’s report;

 

The state of health care and adult social care in England 2017/18.

This is our annual assessment of health and social care in England and looks at the trends, highlights examples of good and outstanding care, and identifies factors that maintain high-quality care.

CQC 20181008_State of Care 17-18_report_lowres_final

This year’s report tells a story of contrasts. Most people in England receive good care, but quality and access to care are not consistent, and people’s overall experiences are varied with access to good care increasingly dependents on how well local systems work together.

 


The future of social care: Legal seminars for care providers

 

Surrey, 22 November 2018

Royds Withy King are delighted to invite care owners and directors to our ‘future of social care’ seminar.

In conjunction with our guest speakers we will explore what the future holds for care providers in a world of changing consumer law, workforce challenges and technology.

What can you expect?

Our seminar will be split into three main topics:

  • The future consumer: changing service user demands and increased consumer law protection
  • The future care workforce: opportunities and challenges
  • The future of care: the impacts of technology on operations, regulation and safeguarding.

We will also be joined by expert guest speakers:

Bhavna Keane Rao of BKR Care Consultancy

Nathan Hollow of PLMR

Surrey, Thursday 22 November
Denbies Wine Estate
London Road
Dorking
Surrey, RH5 6AA

Timings

8.30am – 1.30pm

Cost

Our standard ticket price is £45 plus VAT. If you are a Care Association member, tickets are discounted to £25 plus VAT.

The event timings are:

8.30am – Arrive for registration
9am – Our speakers
12.30pm – Lunch and networking
1.30pm – Finish

Book your place

For further details, and to book your place, please use the links below:

For Surrey click here

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only


Employment law update London, 14 November 2018

Royds Withy King’s Employment & HR team are delighted to invite you to our first annual Employment law update.

Keeping up with changes in employment law has been as much of a challenge this year as ever – from the Gender Pay Gap to GDPR and, of course, the usual array of important court decisions.

This seminar will provide an overview of the year, and will benefit anyone who has responsibility for dealing with HR issues in the workplace. We will:

  • look back at the changes in employment legislation over the last 12 months
  • highlight recent case law and it’s practical impact for business
  • look ahead at changes coming into force in the next 12 months including the anticipated impact of the post Brexit immigration system on the UK workforce.

This seminar will deliver practical tips to help you comply with legal requirements and best practice. Employment law Partners, Richard Woodman, Gemma OspedaleHelen Murphie, David Israel and Solicitor Jasmine Chadha will deliver essential updates on key employment law issues and take questions from the floor.

Agenda:

6.00pm   – Welcome drinks and canapés
6.30pm   – Seminar begins
8.00pm   – Networking and any further questions
8.30pm   – Close

We hope to see you there.

Best wishes,

Richard Woodman

Partner
Employment & HR
T: 0207 842 1439
Email me

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.


Care Minister urges health and care system to join ‘vital’ collaboration push

Caroline Dinenage, Minister for Care, today urged health and care organisations to achieve closer collaboration to improve the quality of care and support.

Her comments follow a meeting with national health and social care organisations to update on Quality Matters, an initiative aimed at improving adult social care that is co-led by partners from across the sector.

During the session the Minister heard examples of how Quality Matters is supporting improvement across the system, including the new digital resource ‘Unlocking capacity: smarter together’ which is inspiring local organisations and system leaders to work collaboratively to deliver seamless, person-centred care.

Caroline Dinenage, Minister for Care said:

“Quality Matters is a vital commitment to improve adult social care for people who need support, their families, carers and the dedicated care workforce. Every part of the system has a role to play and this new platform provides valuable advice and support to achieve closer collaboration between health and care in local areas.

“It’s up to all of us to work together better –  I encourage local leaders across the health and care system to use this resource to help drive up the quality of care in their area.”

The resource, which was trailed at NHS Expo earlier this month, provides advice and information to help local health and social care leaders support new ways of working and ensure services are working together at every stage of planning and provision.

The free online resource features successful examples of collaborative working, for example in Dudley they have worked to establish a new model of care with a focus on prevention. As part of this, the council and local NHS worked with care home providers to invest winter pressures funding into flu vaccinations for care home staff to help relieve pressure on the NHS. The result was 80% fewer flu outbreaks in local care homes last winter, compared with the year before.

The resource also includes an animation to help people better understand and navigate adult social care services at a local level.

Professor Gillian Leng, Deputy Chief Executive and Director of Health and Social Care at NICE, said:

“We know bringing together health and social care can really help deliver more joined-up care. Local leaders have a crucial role to play in making this happen and our new Quality Matters resource will help them take vital steps to work innovatively and collaboratively to improve the quality of care and support. Healthcare leaders in particular will find it a highly valuable tool to aid decision making and support more joined up, integrating working.”

Sharon Allen, Chief Executive of Skills for Care said:

“As this great new resource shows, leaders at all levels are already proving that person-centred thinking brings profound benefits to citizens. I commend the seven case studies shown here, each demonstrating the value of collaborative working between health, social care and beyond. I hope local areas are inspired to take the next step – no matter how small or big.”

Dr Karen Kirkham, NHS England National Clinical Advisor for Primary Care, said:

“The Quality Matters resource gives system leaders practical ways to see how collaborative working between health and social care can improve outcomes and make better use of resources. System leadership is one of the most influential factors in shaping organisational culture so ensuring the necessary leadership behaviours, strategies and qualities are developed is fundamental. Whilst systems will be at different stages in their journey, the resource aims to inspire systems to develop new relationships and try something new or different.”

The resource will be followed by a more detailed resource, ‘Integrating Better’, from NHS England and other partners, which will contain more detailed case studies and support for integration.

The Department of Health and Social Care wants to hear from health and care workers at all levels on what more we can do to improve things – we recently launched the Department’s new workforce engagement platform, TalkHealthandCare, where people can sign up to submit their ideas.


Update from VODG

Social care needs a year round funding solution that works for all says VODG

News link: https://www.vodg.org.uk/news/social-care-needs-a-year-round-funding-solution-that-works-for-all-says-vodg/ 

The Secretary of State’s announcement of £240million to help local authorities alleviate winter pressures on the NHS is welcome says the Voluntary Organisations Disability Group (VODG).

VODG, the infrastructure organisation that support voluntary disability and care providers, is calling for a sustainable financial settlement. The group is also emphasising that new investment must work for everyone who relies on social care services.

VODG chief executive Dr Rhidian Hughes said:

“Money to support the system this Winter is welcome. But social care urgently requires a lasting, year round, financial settlement that works for all. The forthcoming Autumn Budget offers government the opportunity to identify a long term and sustainable funding solution for adult social care that covers both working age disabled adults and older people. People who rely on essential care services deserve nothing less.”

The Secretary of State’s announcement is set within the context of local authorities’ planned savings for adult social care in 2018/19 alone estimated to be around £700million, and cumulative adult social care savings since 2010 have amounted to £7billion. In addition the government has continued to postponed its Green Paper on the long-term funding plan for adult social care.

VODG has also raised concerns that government is seeking to save £200 million or more through reforms to mental capacity legislation, which VODG has earlier described as “flawed”.

 


The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) want to hear from people working in social care as part of their work to

develop a long term plan for social care and the NHS.

They have launched Talk Health and Care, to capture the comments, views and feedback of people working in social care.

We are encouraging everyone we work with, whatever their role, to contribute to this discussion. It is important that your

ideas, opinions and experiences are heard.

Please take the time to contribute to Talk Health and Care and encourage others,to do the same.


How to minimise GDPR risk to the health and social care sector

As we are all well aware by now, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into force on 25 May 2018 and with it came a duty on all organisations to report certain types of personal data breaches to relevant supervisory authorities.
The health and social care sector will control and process some of the most sensitive personal data there is. Whether intentionally or entirely by mistake, data breaches can and do occur.

A month after the system was originally launched, a total of 122 incidents were notified to the ICO through the DSPT by organisations in the health and care sector. Examples of incidents that were reported include the loss of a patient’s scanned in notes; a cyber incident (similar to the WannaCry incident of 2017) affecting the availability of clinical services; 10 DNA profiles (biometric data) with names sent to the wrong email address; and a set of case notes found in a bin outside a supermarket. To read more click here for our blog.

GDPR jargon

Because of this, it is important that organisations within the sector have robust procedures in place in order for their personal data to be properly secured. However, like any area of regulation, there is a good deal of jargon involved in data protection. This is where we can help

Click here to view our Jargon-Buster which will help you to fill in the background and indicate what actions you should be taking to ensure compliance – as well as explaining many of the technical terms.

How we can help

Don’t worry, if it still won’t stick and you require clarity, or if you would like to discuss data advice, we provide helpful fixed fee products for all stages of the compliance process.

To view our fixed fee options please click here.

Emma Banister Dean

Partner
Health & Social Care
T: 01865 268 370
Email me

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.


Social care disaster looms

Employers have been warned of a deepening crisis in the social care sector which will affect hundreds of thousands of elderly and disabled people in the UK. A new report by the think tank Global Future predicts a bleak future for social care in the UK – unless the Government takes action, and strikes a deal to guarantee free movement of EU staff to help care for the booming elderly population.

What does the future hold for the social care sector?

Social care employers have been aware of the staffing crisis in the sector for some time, Britain is expected to ‘lose’ 115,000 European care staff by 2026, and these predictions won’t come as a surprise. There are many factors, but Brexit is a cause for alarm because of the great reliance on EU workers.

What can you do now to prepare?

Helen Murphie, business immigration specialist in our Health & Social Care team, discusses what you can do now to prepare.

“We are advising our clients to make plans now. There is great deal of uncertainty about the situation and keeping abreast of the changes is not always easy.

“In the coming months, we will be holding seminars on Brexit and immigration for our clients to help them and their workers to navigate the new rules as and when they arrive. We also offer workshops for European staff regarding Brexit and settlement.”

To learn more about how you can prepare – work in partnership with schools and colleges, review your pay structures or offer other perks – read our latest article in full.

Helen Murphie

Partner
Health & Social Care
T: 020 7842 1434
Email me

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.


THE SECRET OF SUCCESS – ALIGN YOUR LEARNING TO THE CQC’S KEY LINES OF ENQUIRY!

Many of our UK members are achieving outstanding services and ratings from the CQC! To help you achieve the same, we’ve aligned our training courses with CQC regulations and key lines of enquiry (KLOE), whilst also giving you peace of mind by ensuring all our courses are constantly updated with current industry legislation and best practice.

CREATE VALUE AND OUTSTANDING SERVICES TO YOUR FACILITY WITH ALTURA LEARNING.

If you would like to know more about how Altura’s learning solutions will help ensure your staff are inspired to deliver services that are

Safe, Effective, Caring, Responsive and Well-Led.

Please visit the link below

https://www.alturalearning.com/key-lines-of-enquiry/

For a limited time only we are giving providers the opportunity to watch our course programme ‘Preparing for an Inspection’  FREE of charge just click the link below and enjoy!

https://www.alturalearning.com/course-preparing-for-an-inspection-uk/

For more information about the comprehensive Altura product catalogue

Raj Kumar
Business Development Manager

raj.kumar@alturalearning.com
07534 033392


Social Care Compliance Scheme: HMRC creates confusion

Following HMRC’s letter to to providers who had joined the Social Care Compliance Scheme (SCCS), James Sage in our Health & Social Care team has written an article on sleep-in shift payments and the factors providers need to consider when deciding whether to withdraw from the SCCS.

Recently, in Royal Mencap Society-v-Tomlinson-Blake, the Court of Appeal held that ‘sleep-in’ shifts were not subject to the National Minimum Wage. The ruling, while providing welcome relief for care providers, left a few questions unanswered. One of them was how HMRC proposed to deal with providers who had joined the Social Care Compliance Scheme. HMRC has now provided further guidance, but has it brought any clarity?

Last Friday (17 August 2018), HMRC wrote to providers who had joined the Social Care Compliance Scheme (SCCS) stating that “all original timeframes and requirements of the scheme remain in place, namely:

  • employers must complete their self-review and submit their declarations to HMRC by no later than 12 months of their application to the SCCS or 31 December 2018, whichever is sooner
  • all non-sleeping time arrears must be paid before employers return their declaration
  • any sleeping time arrears must be paid to workers within 3 months of returning the declaration or by 31 March 2019, whichever is sooner.”

HMRC states that “sleeping time arrears must be paid”

HMRC’s correspondence has left many providers confused following the Court of Appeal ruling in the Mencap case that sleep-in shifts were not subject to the National Minimum Wage. On the face of it, HMRC’s statement that “any sleeping time arrears must be paid to workers” is inconsistent with the Court of Appeal ruling that sleep-in shifts are not subject to the National Minimum Wage.

However, in our view this was a deliberate, albeit clumsy, attempt by HMRC to confirm that not all sleep-in shifts will be exempt from the National Minimum Wage.

Should you remain in the Scheme?

Read our article in full to find out what kind of sleep-in shifts are and are not subject to the National Minimum Wage and examine all factors you need to consider in reaching a decision whether to withdraw from the SCCS.

James Sage

Partner
Health & Social Care
T: 01225 730 231
Email me

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.

 


This Healthy Futures project is being delivered across the whole of Central and South London

The downloadable leaflets below provide information for employers and for candidates. If you have quesations about this project, please contact Emma Glasscock, details below.

GSS – Healthy Futures Leaflet – Employers

GSS Healthy Futures Leaflet – Candidates

Healthy Futures is an ESF funded programme free to use and designed to help you recruit new employees with background training and continuing support.

Emma Glasscock
Business Development Manager
Global Solution Services UK Ltd
Main:    0844 745 2001
Office:  020 8665 4297
Mobile: 07921 036 927
Email:  emmag@globalsolutionservices.co.uk
Web :  www.globalsolutionservices.co.uk

Making peace with death: National attitudes to death,

dying and bereavement

Co-op Funeralcare Media Report

Co-op Funeralcare Report August 2018.


Sleep-in Update from VODG

News link: https://www.vodg.org.uk/news/vodg-raises-concerns-as-hmrc-jumped-the-gun-ahead-of-official-guidance-on-sleep-in-payments/

VODG raises concerns as HMRC “jumped the gun” ahead of official guidance on sleep in payments

Following the Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake Court of Appeal judgement on sleep in payments VODG, and wider sector bodies, have called on government to make a decision and to be clear about what changes it is proposing ahead of wider consultation. The latest communication from HMRC, which VODG understands is reaching a large number of social care providers, is adding confusion and raising more unanswered questions.

Commenting on the latest developments VODG chair Steve Scown said:

“The sector is waiting for official guidance from the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. We have worked with officials to inform the development of policy options yet are today surprised to learn that providers are opening a confusing communication from HMRC. Providers expect clarity not uncertainty from HMRC. We are calling on government to explain why HMRC have jumped the gun and acted before BEIS have issued official guidance.”

A HRMC communication seen by VODG includes the following points:

“HMRC have decided that it is appropriate to continue to operate the Social Care Compliance Scheme (SCCS) allowing participating employers to complete a self-review, taking the judgement into consideration, and make a declaration to HMRC.

All original timeframes and requirements of the scheme remain in place:

  • employers must complete their self-review and submit their declarations to HMRC by no later than 12 months of their application to the SCCS or 31 December 2018, whichever is sooner
  • all non-sleeping time arrears must be paid before employers return their declaration
  • any sleeping time arrears must be paid to workers within 3 months of returning the declaration or by 31 March 2019, whichever is sooner.

Failure to adhere to the terms or timeframes of the SCCS, or withdrawing from the SCCS may result in HMRC opening an investigation into your pay practices.

Department for Business, Energy & industrial Strategy (BEIS) are currently reviewing their guidance in Calculating the Minimum Wage and this will be published in due course. Employers will be issued with an updated SCCS Employer guide once the revised Calculating the Minimum Wage is available.

If, during the course of your review you assess there has been an underpayment of National Minimum Wage, either for any sleep-in-shifts or for other reasons, HMRC will continue to allow Social Care sector employers to deal with the tax implications of these arrears using the Alternative PAYE Arrangement (APA).”

HMRC had earlier committed to a further communication by 17 August 2018 so it has done what it said it – despite knowing BEIS is developing its new guidance.

Following the Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake Court of Appeal judgement VODG has amended its campaign page which can be accessed here.

VODG (Voluntary Organisations Disability Group)

Visit our website, check out twitter and connect on LinkedIn.

Please email events.networks@vodg.org.uk about our networks and events, info@vodg.org.uk for general enquiries and finance.administration@vodg.org.uk for accounts.


Social Works Ltd have asked LCAS to let you know that they’ve got an open-booking session on the 7th September at the Peckham Levels for the L3 Award in Awareness of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (RQF).

Peckham Levels; https://www.peckhamlevels.org/

It really is a great course for staff, especially seniors, co-ordinators, managers etc. Jennifer, the tutor, is a Best Interests Assessor, registered social worker and SW Practice Educator, and really knows her stuff!

Below are details and a booking form, along with Social Work’s contact details for any queries.

Please send back the completed booking form as soon as possible and then Social Works will invoice.

It has a claim value of £60 per learner, and Social Works charge £30 (+ VAT of £6) per learner on top of that – effectively, so long as learners complete and pass (everyone has passed to date!), it therefore only has a net cost to organisations of £36 inc VAT.

SW L3 MCA RQF Course Booking Form

SW Level 3 Award in Awareness of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (RQF) outline

John Buttle

Social Works Limited

Tel: 020 7277 9117
Mob: 07968 195 491

www.socialworksltd.co.uk


Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership

National Audit of Dementia: Spotlight audit 2017-2018

The National Audit of Dementia (care in general hospitals) (NAD) examines aspects of care received by people with dementia in general hospitals in England and Wales. In addition, NAD provides national and local reports to support hospitals to identify areas for quality improvement and share good practice, helping to improve outcomes for patients. NAD has carried out three rounds of audit, reporting in 2011, 2013 and 2017. This spotlight audit on delirium has been carried out to look in more detail at an area where hospitals have seemed to be underperforming and to clarify inconsistencies in the data.

the report can be downlaoded from

https://www.hqip.org.uk/resource/national-audit-of-dementia-report-2017-2018/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Out+today%3A+New+national+clinical+audit+reports&utm_campaign=2018-08-09+New+Resource+Notification+Email+%28FINAL%29


Should you keep or delete your company’s data in a post-GDPR world?

The length of time for which various types of personal data can be retained for is still a big question for many organisations working towards GDPR compliance. With the new Data Protection Act 2018 now in force, it is more important than ever to get retention right and know when to keep and when to delete.

The GDPR and the DPA

So you may think that everything you need to know is already in the GDPR, but this isn’t actually the case. The Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA) incorporates GDPR into UK law, but it also extends the data protection regime and exercises flexibilities where the GDPR permits discretion for member states to legislate in certain areas.

One of these areas is processing of special category data. The GDPR states that you should not process special category data unless you have a lawful basis for processing and satisfy a specific condition.

One of the specific conditions which can be used to process special category data is that the processing is necessary in the field of employment, social security and social protection law. However, the DPA 2018 places explicit additional obligations in these circumstances – and having a data retention policy is one of them.

Retention policy – one size fits all?

Unfortunately, it is not that simple. Any retention policy should set out how an organisation classifies and manages the retention and disposal of the personal data processed. However, the specifics will be different because no organisation processes data in exactly the same way and for the same purposes.

So what should you actually be doing? How long is it really necessary to retain data? Read our latest article for tips on having an effective retention policy.

The GDPR came into force on 25 May 2018, yet the journey to compliance is far from over for many organisations. We want to hear from you about your most important and ongoing GDPR-related questions.

Click here to fill out our short survey.

Ellen Goodland

Trainee Solicitor
T: 01225 730 248
Email me

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.


The NAO have published a report; The health and social care interface

https://www.nao.org.uk/report/the-health-and-social-care-interface/

Links you to a page where this can be dowloaded.

Background to the report

The population’s health and social care needs have changed greatly since the National Health Service (NHS) was established in 1948. People are now living longer, often with multiple and complex conditions that require managing. However, the division of care into two separate systems – health and social care – has not fundamentally changed over that time.

Content and scope of the report

In this report we present and discuss 16 challenges to improved joint working. We also highlight some of the work being carried out nationally and locally to overcome these challenges and the progress that has been made. We draw out the risks presented by inherent differences between the health and social care systems and how national and local bodies are managing these.


Beyond barriers: how older people move between health and care in England

CQC have reviewed health and social care systems across 20 local authority areas to see how services work together to support people aged 65 and over.  Recommendations can be found in their report

20180702_beyond_barriers


2019/20 Pan-London Continuing HealthCare (CHC) Cost Modelling process

We have been approached by NHS London  Purchased Healthcare Team to encourage providers working in the London area  to participate in the 2019/20 Pan-London Continuing HealthCare (CHC) Cost Modelling process being undertaken over the course of the next couple of months.

The pan-London CHC in nursing homes AQP contract requires that prices are reviewed annually. To fulfil this requirement, in the 2016/17 nursing homes AQP price review, the London Purchased Healthcare (LPH)  Team conducted a comprehensive price development project , including development of a cost model. For the 2017/18 and 2018/19 price reviews, the LPH team updated the cost model for inflation, pension impacts and increases to the National Living Wage.

Following the 2017 sourcing group meetings for the Nursing Home AQP re-procurement, the London CCGs and nursing home AQP providers committed to revising the existing AQP cost model ahead of 2019/20 contract year. To fulfil this commitment the LPH team is inviting providers and NHS and Local Authority commissioners to input on changes to the price structure and existing cost model.

We have attached some background documents including the schedule of meetings.

 

2019-20 Nursing Home AQP cost model SGM ToR v0.1

2019-20 AQP cost model SGM schedule _v0 1

 

If you are interested in participating please contact

Matthew Wright

London Purchased Healthcare Team

matthew.wright123@nhs.net


Sleep-ins; What Happens Next?

Recently, overturning a significant body of case law, the Court of Appeal ruled that the National Minimum Wage is only payable when staff are awake and actually working, not when they are asleep and only available for work.

The ruling provides huge relief for care providers who no longer face the prospect of having to fund substantial back pay liability. Insolvencies and redundancies have been averted and the financial viability of the sector has taken a step back from the precipice.

So the crisis has been averted, at least for now.

But what happens next?

In our latest article on this subject, James Sage explains how the Court of Appeal made its decision and addresses the new questions it has raised, including:

  • Is the ruling likely to be appealed?
  • Are all sleep-in shifts covered by the ruling?
  • What happens to care providers who increased their sleep-in rates and/or day rates to ‘offset’ the underpayment? Will they now seek to reduce those rates?
  • What happens to providers who joined the Social Care Compliance Scheme?
  • Will local authorities reduce sleep-in rates now?

Click here to read the article in full and find out how last week’s judgment may affect your care business.

Our Health & Social Care team will provide more detail about the judgment shortly.

James Sage

Partner
Health & Social Care
T: 01225 730 231
Email me

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.


The Government response to the Health and Social Care Select Committee Second Report of Session 2017-19, ‘The NursingWorkforce’

has been published and can be downloaded from; https://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/Health/Correspondence/2017-19/Government-response-to-nursing-workforce-report-17-19-Cm-9669.pdf

 


Are you covered where it counts?

Care insurance specialists Towergate Insurance,

discuss buying the right insurance cover for your business.

We are sure you understand the importance of buying insurance that protects your business and service users, but how much do you really understand about the cover you buy? Insurance can be tricky at times and often people don’t understand what they need or sometimes, even what is legally required.

The most important aspects to consider are does it protect you from the things most likely to go wrong in the care home environment? And does it meet the sector’s legal and regulatory requirements?  We always recommend speaking directly with a specialist insurance broker before getting covered and the following advice should help ensure you have the right cover for your business.

Carolyn Baker-Mellor, Head of Care within Towergate’s Care Division says:

“We often receive calls from potential customers who are underinsured with their current provider. Many businesses don’t understand what they are paying for, which is worrying when you consider the implications if something goes wrong”.

Mandatory insurances

In general, some covers, such as Employers’ Liability, are necessary to trade legally. It covers your liability for bodily injury, illness, or disease to your employees. Many diseases develop over a long period and may not become apparent for some time. Employers’ Liability policies are normally underwritten on a “claims occurring” basis which means that the insurer who provided cover at the time the disease was caused must assume responsibility for paying the claim. Whilst there is no legal requirement to do so, Towergate currently recommends you keep your insurance records indefinitely.

Public Liability Insurance is designed to provide you with financial protection should a member of the public (including service users) or even another company, claim they have suffered as a result of your negligence or that of your employees. The basic cover is for sums you are legally liable to pay in respect of bodily injury, death, disease, illness or loss of or damage to property. Unlike Employer’s Liability, Public Liability Insurance is not compulsory although many insurance brokers will offer this cover as standard up to £5 million. Towergate offers this cover as standard up to £10 million and to find out you have the right level of cover you need to check with your local authority contracts, if any.

What can you do to get the right protection?

As needs change, businesses grow, diversify, move into different areas, sometimes even downsize, and any of these things could have an implication on your insurance. That’s why we have put together these simple tips to get you started along the road to making sure you have the best business insurance which covers you where you need it most.

  • Take the time to understand your policy and any jargon you don’t understand.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions. For example, do you know what Business Interruption or medical malpractice really means for your business?
  • Check and double check the levels of cover you have. A good insurance provider will be happy to explain, and won’t want to put down the phone until they are sure you understand what you are paying for.
  • Check the assumptions made in the insurance policy about how you run your business, as these could limit your cover. These assumptions can often be hidden away in small print when you buy over the phone. Do any of them apply to you?
  • Speak to your insurance provider if something changes in your business. Have you taken on staff, has your turnover increased or has the type of service you offer been extended?
  • Remember, insurers set premiums to reflect the risk a business represents so it is important to demonstrate:
    • Robust management and health and safety procedures are in place.
    • Staff are adequately trained.
    • Claims are the exception rather than the rule.

Where can I get advice?

Towergate Insurance has been providing specialist broking services to the caring sector for more than 30 years. As well as a range of products and services created to meet the needs of care providers, their claims advisers all have specific expertise in the caring professions and can advise you on the right cover for your business. For more information on how Towergate can support you, visit www.towergateinsurance.co.uk or call 0330 123 5172.

Towergate Insurance is a trading name of Towergate Underwriting Group Limited. Registered Office: Towergate House, Eclipse Park, Sittingbourne Road, Maidstone, Kent, ME14 3EN. Authorised and Regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.



This is an update (July 18th) from James Sage, published in The Guardian, following on from the article below;

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jul/17/back-pay-ruling-hands-care-providers-a-lifeline-but-what-happens-next

 


Court of Appeal delivers sleep-in judgment – crisis averted?

The Court of Appeal has today delivered care providers a life line in its Mencap judgment, saying that they do not have to pay staff the National Minimum Wage during ‘sleep-in’ shifts.

The decision lifts an estimated £400m burden from care providers that would have pushed many into insolvency.

What does the decision mean?

The Court of Appeal decision reverses an earlier decision of the Employment Appeal Tribunal that found that sleep-in shifts in a care setting were working time for the purposes of national minimum wage laws.

It is very welcome news for care providers and was a crucial outcome for the sector. Many providers will get a better night’s sleep tonight after years of anxiety about potential liabilities.

Will there be an appeal?

It is possible that the decision will be appealed to the Supreme Court, which will continue the uncertainty and anxiety felt by the sector. We very much hope this won’t happen. However, providers should sit tight until we know for sure.

Are there any further issues in light of the decision?

The decision also raises some serious issues that now need to be addressed. The Government, in response to the earlier ruling of the Employment Appeal Tribunal, introduced a Social Care Compliance Scheme for providers to declare their non-compliance to HMRC and repay staff. The Government must clarify what will happen to those providers who joined the Scheme and any HMRC enforcement action must be halted, at least until we know if the decision will be appealed.

Providers will also need to carefully manage communications with staff about the ruling, particularly where staff may have an expectation that they will be receiving back pay payments.

Whilst a doomsday scenario has been avoided the Government must take the opportunity in its Green Paper to find a sensible solution to the funding crisis affecting the sector.

Our Health & Social Care team will provide more detail about the judgment shortly.

James Sage

Partner
Health & Social Care
T: 01225 730 231
Email me

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.


Voluntary Organisations Disability Group

CARE SECTOR RESPONDS TO COURT OVERTURNING STAFF SLEEP-IN BACK PAY-

CALLS ON THE GOVERNMENT TO LEGISLATE QUICKLY AND FURTHER FUND SECTOR

Today, 13th July, the court has ruled in favor of Mencap in the case over sleep-in back pay. This overturns an employment tribunal which ruled that workers were entitled to the National Minimum Wage (NMW) for every hour of a sleep-in shift.

Reacting to the decision, the #SolveSleepIns Alliance, a coalition formed to deal with the sleep-in crisis which represents providers for people with learning disabilities in the UK, is calling on the Government to legislate for all care workers to be entitled to the NMW for all shifts, including sleep-ins, and to raise the level of funding provided to Local Authorities (LAs) and care providers in line with new legislation.

The 2015 case resulted in HMRC pursuing care providers offering sleep-in services for six years of back pay for all staff who had performed sleep-in shifts. This bill was estimated to be around £400 million in total for the entire care sector. In 2017, HMRC set up the Social Care Compliance Scheme which gave care providers one year to self-assess their liability and a further three months to pay back workers. Notably, this scheme offered no assistance to providers in assessing their liability, locating their past staff of up to six years ago nor any information on how past and current employees would be paid. Government did not increase money going to LAs or care providers for the sleep-in shifts moving forward nor any new money to cover the back pay.

Public services to care for people with disabilities ar funde by LAs. Central Government funding is then provided to LAs who often contract with care providers to deliver services.

The potential monetary shortfall expected by care providers, many of them charities, has already lead to some providers closing and handing back untenable contracts. Personal budget holders, who contract independently with carers, also face a back pay bill of up to six years.

The #SolveSleepIns Alliance, comprised of the Association for Real Change, Care England, Learning Disability England, Learning Disability Voices and VODG, remains committed to paying workers fairly and ensuring care services are funded properly so they can continue to function at the high level people who rely on care services depend on and deserve.

Dr Rhidian Hughes, chief executive of the Voluntary Organisations Disability Group said:

“There are no winners from this decision. Now the Government has a chance to do the right thing – enshrining and supporting the National Minimum Wage (NMW) by ensuring legislation is clear that all workers are entitled to the NMW and funding all essential services at this level

“We are calling for additional new money pledged for overnight care to fund the NMW to make sleep-ins fair and fit for the future.

“We call on Government to make clear its intention to introduce urgent legislation so that time spent asleep is taken into account when calculating NLW/NMW.

“There needs to be a clear set of rules about exactly when NLW applies, and for Government to fund these vital statutory services to avoid any future crises. Without this decisive action, our staff remain in an uncertain position with regards to their pay.

“Government must now be completely clear on how sleep-ins are to be paid and funded. If Government wishes to avoid further complication, it must, through revised legislation, clarify what hard working care workers are entitled to, and precisely how it, and local authorities will fund this going forward.

“This decision is not a victory, nor does it provide the substantive clarity necessary, following years of indecision on this vital question for social care services and the valuable care workers who run them.

“People throughout the UK who rely on care services, care workers and the providers of these essential community services deserve a swift resolution – Government must legislate and pledge funding that will support care services now and into the future.”

Tim Cooper, Co-Chair of Learning Disability Voices & CEO at United Response, said:

“We remain committed to paying our staff fairly for the work they do.

“Our workforce is our greatest asset, we believe that National Living Wage (NLW) rates should apply for sleep-in shifts, the Government has said that they agree.  We call on the Government to act swiftly and decisively to  remove the confusion by setting out in law that NLW applies to sleep in shifts and to remove the fear by ensuring providers are properly funded  for all shifts, including sleep-ins, at the NLW.

“There is a moral obligation for the Government to ensure a fair deal for employees and employers alike. It is now over to the Government who need to provide stability for the sector after the last three years of uncertainty.”

VODG (Voluntary Organisations Disability Group)

Visit our website, check out twitter and connect on LinkedIn.

Please email events.networks@vodg.org.uk about our networks and events, info@vodg.org.uk for general enquiries


 

Citation’s article on Friday’s Court of Appeal (July 13th 2018) ruling regarding sleep ins and minimum wage.

https://www.citation.co.uk/news/care/carers-not-entitled-to-the-nmw-for-sleep-in-shifts/

———————

Citation’s July Business Briefings

These are free to attend events. Join our experts who will discuss the latest HR and Health & Safety updates and advice to support you and your business.

What’s covered?
––
Changes to employment law in 2018 so far
––
Support with GDPR compliance
––
Reduce costly employee absence
––
Manage your fire safety and risk assessment obligations

4th – Uckfield
9:30am – 11:30am

5th – Rickmansworth
9:30am – 11:30am

5th – Harrow
3pm – 4:30pm

10th – Sittingbourne
9:30am -11am

11th – Rochford
9:30am – 11am

12th – Central London
9am – 11am

0345 310 0650
RSVP@citation.co.uk
citation.co.uk/events


SLEEP-IN Update

Below you will see a series of letters with regard to the situation around sleep-ins.

Correspondence-to-Secretary-of-State-financial-liability-of-sleep-ins


CMA propose sweeping changes to service user contracts

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) have issued their long-awaited draft Guidance designed to help care home providers comply with their consumer law obligations. This Guidance is still subject to consultation with the final version due in the autumn.

If implemented in its current form (which we consider likely) the proposals contained in the draft Guidance will have wide-reaching implications for the way in which care providers (i) provide information to prospective service users prior to admission and (ii) the terms on which contracts are entered into.

The key areas covered by the Guidance include:

  • information
  • charging of upfront fees and deposits
  • charging fees on death
  • increasing fees
  • the use of guarantors
  • funded Nursing Care (FNC) payments
  • fees when a person is absent
  • third party top-ups.

What should you be doing now?

Failure to implement the Guidance may put providers in breach of consumer legislation, which could result in enforcement action by the CMA, Trading Standards, CQC and residents.

Most providers will need to amend their current service user contracts to some degree to ensure they do not fall foul of consumer legislation.

To learn more about the proposed changes and find out how how our Health & Social Care team can help, read our latest article in full.

 

Hazel Phillips

Partner
Health & Social Care
T: 01225 730 166
Email me

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.

 


Service User Contracts.

This is very important and something that social care providers need to be aware of, take notice of and act to protect their organisations. Please read and if you have questions, the contacts for more information are provided.

It is now becoming clearer to us at RWK that it is imperative that care providers review their service user contracts.  RWK are offering a model contract with guidance notes at discounted rates (with a generous rebate for the care association). . There is a separate contract for residential/nursing and homecare.

These are the attachments, which provide full details.

Template letter for care association members (W3556248xAE01B)

Model Contract Application Form (W3556250xAE01B)

The draft Competion & Markets Authority Guidance came out last week and is far more extensive than we expected. As a result we think most providers are going to have to make changes to their contracts and admissions processes in order to be compliant, particularly around the following:

  1. The provision of prescribed information to prospective residents at three separate stages: on first contact, before they accept an offer of a place and on confirmation and finalisation of the offer
  2. Charging of upfront fees and deposits
  3.   Charging fees on death.
  4. Increasing fees
  5. The use of guarantors
  6. FNC payments
  7. Fees when a person is absent

We are also offering a bespoke option if providers want a tailored version of the contract and detailed advice on implementation. Fees by negotiation.

For further information, or to discuss your options, please contact

Mei-Ling Huang

RWK Partner Dispute Resolution

D: 01225 459 950 T: 01225 730100 ext: 1174


2019/20 Pan-London Continuing HealthCare (CHC) Cost Modelling process

 2019-20 AQP cost model SGM schedule _v0 1  

2019-20 Nursing Home AQP cost model SGM ToR v0.1

 

2019/20 Pan-London Continuing HealthCare (CHC) Cost Modelling process

We have been approached by NHS London  Purchased Healthcare Team to encourage providers working in the London area  to participate in the 2019/20 Pan-London Continuing HealthCare (CHC) Cost Modelling process being undertaken over the course of the next couple of months.

The pan-London CHC in nursing homes AQP contract requires that prices are reviewed annually. To fulfil this requirement, in the 2016/17 nursing homes AQP price review, the London Purchased Healthcare (LPH)  Team conducted a comprehensive price development project , including development of a cost model. For the 2017/18 and 2018/19 price reviews, the LPH team updated the cost model for inflation, pension impacts and increases to the National Living Wage.

Following the 2017 sourcing group meetings for the Nursing Home AQP re-procurement, the London CCGs and nursing home AQP providers committed to revising the existing AQP cost model ahead of 2019/20 contract year. To fulfil this commitment the LPH team is inviting providers and NHS and Local Authority commissioners to input on changes to the price structure and existing cost model.

We have attached some background documents including the schedule of meetings.

If you are interested in participating please contact

Matthew Wright

London Purchased Healthcare Team

matthew.wright123@nhs.net


Report focuses on key steps to help people move out of long-stay inpatient care

LINK: https://www.vodg.org.uk/news/report-focuses-on-key-steps-to-help-people-move-out-of-long-stay-inpatient-care/

A new report outlines the challenges and solutions to moving people with learning disabilities, autism and/or mental health conditions out of long-stay inpatient care.

The report from VODG (Voluntary Organisations Disability Group), Transforming care – the challenges and solutions, addresses NHS England’s policy ambition to enable people to move from inpatient settings, closer to their homes.

Today’s findings are based on the work of VODG’s Provider Taskforce, which is a group of organisations that are collectively responding to the transforming care agenda. The pilot project described in the new report set out to develop support assessment and proposals for 27 people originally from London who had been in inpatient settings for longer than five years.

The report is not a formal evaluation of that work, but offers insights into delivering NHS England’s policy ambition both in London as well as nationally. It also sets out recommendations for more strategic future steps.

Rhidian Hughes, VODG chief executive, said:

“Our pilot work clearly shows that each individual we supported would have been able to live well within a local community, with the right housing and support. However, this aim was often undermined by multiple, often system-wide issues that delayed or blocked a move out of hospital. The focus should be on the best outcomes for the individuals concerned, but this was hampered by challenges such as unrealistic expectations about the costs of high quality community provision and rigid procurement processes.

The problem was not a lack of community-based care providers, but the fact that there was not a strategic approach to identifying appropriate support for each person. Today’s report reiterates VODG’s commitment to focusing efforts on the transforming care agenda.”

The challenges involving commissioners, funders and care providers include:

  • delays in hospital discharge plans, including a lack of knowledge in local authorities about potential community support options
  • negative attitudes and aspirations towards people supported (for example, referring to people by patient identity number instead of by their name)
  • confusion about costs, with commissioners and funders underestimating the cost of initial support immediately after discharge and/or therapeutic support
  • a lack of support to families, despite the fact that responsive ongoing support to families is critical to the sustainability of support to their loved one.

The report also identifies three indicative patterns of housing and support needs for those moving from long-term inpatient facilities: bespoke accommodation and support for people to live alone; bespoke accommodation and support within a core and cluster model; shared housing and support.

Solutions that could help reduce delays discharge times and support community-based housing and care options include:

·      a pan-London approach to meeting individual needs

·      stronger accountability

·      clearer communication between professionals

·      improved knowledge and information about the cost of high quality care

·      earlier identification and sourcing of housing options

·      better links with clinical and therapeutic support.

Longer term steps include developing a strategic regional pathway to move people out of hospital or prevent readmission and a detailed analysis of costs and funding arrangements. VODG also advocates the development of a sustainable care, support and housing market to support the current and future needs of people with learning disability and/or autism. In addition, the creation of a care provider network would offer the potential to map organisations’ capacity, skill and ability to deliver appropriate, good quality support for those leaving long-stay facilities.

VODG (Voluntary Organisations Disability Group)

Visit our website, check out twitter and connect on LinkedIn.

Please email events.networks@vodg.org.uk about our networks and events, info@vodg.org.uk for general enquiries and finance.administration@vodg.org.uk for accounts.


FREE HR and Health & Safety business briefings

We would like to invite you to attend a Citation business briefing. Join our

experts who will discuss the latest HR and Health & Safety updates and

advice to support you and your business.

What’s covered?
––
Changes to employment law in 2018 so far
––
Ensure your business is GDPR ready
––
Reduce costly employee absence
––
Manage your fire safety and risk assessment obligations

6th June – Woking
9:00am – 11:00am

27thJune  – London Barnet
9:30am-11:00am

0345 310 0650
RSVP@citation.co.uk
citation.co.uk/events


 

To celebrate our rebrand from ACC to Altura learning and all of the exciting changes this brings, we would like to share one of our programmes with you – free of charge for the next two weeks!

“Customer Service:  A Five Star Experience! “

I’m sure like us, going that extra mile to ensure those you care for and their families receive the best service possible is paramount to your organisation.

Before watching the programme, consider the following questions:

  • Recall a time from your experience when you received excellent customer service, what made it excellent?
  • Do you think about the people you care for and the colleagues you interact with as your ‘customers’?
  • What is your organisation’s comments and feedback policy?

With our video, learn how to provide a five star service experience for the older people & improve their quality of life in your care.

Click here to access the programme.

Please feel free to share this link with your staff and colleagues!
Customer Service,
Altura Learning, previously ACC

Raj Kumar
Business Development Manager
07534 033392


UK CARE SECTOR ON BRINK OF FAILURE DUE TO SLEEP-IN PAY CRISIS, NEW SURVEY REVEALS TODAY

LINK: https://www.vodg.org.uk/news/uk-care-sector-on-brink-of-failure-due-to-sleep-in-payments-crisis-new-survey-reveals-today/

SOCIAL MEDIA: #SolveSleepIns

A new survey released today, 8 May 2018, reveals that the viability of nearly 70% of the care sector is threatened by the sleep-in pay crisis.

The independent survey, conducted by Agenda Consulting and Towers & Hamlins LLP, assessed the impact of “sleep-in” pay on the future of the care sector. It highlighted the potential rate of collapse in care services – finding that 30% of people are likely to have their services disrupted in the next year as providers are forced to hand back contracts.

The survey also shows:

  • The care sector is drastically underfunded.
  • Only half of commissioners of care services are paying the National Minimum Wage (NMW) for care workers on sleep-in shifts.
  • The sleep-in back pay bill will make the majority of care providers unviable.
  • An overwhelming majority of care providers have not budgeted for the back pay bill.
  • Some providers will be forced to sell homes which provide care for disabled people, while others will be forced to end services in some regions.

Reacting to the survey results, Rhidian Hughes, Chief Executive of the Voluntary Organisations Disability Group (VODG), said:

“This research confirms what many of our members have been saying for the past two years. This should not only worry the Government, but also the hundreds of local authorities, Clinical Commissioning Groups and community NHS services that rely on these providers to deliver such vital services for vulnerable people.

“The social care sector is facing an existential threat caused by sleep-in pay which is entirely due to unclear and changing Government guidance. Being hit with an unexpected liability for back pay is unfair to the people who rely on care, but also care workers, local authorities and providers of these crucial community services.

“The solution is simple: Government must fund all care work, including sleep-in shifts, at the National Minimum Wage and pay the back pay owed to care workers for the past six years.

“Government rightly funds care services for our most vulnerable citizens – and over the last six years has not funded them at the NMW. Now, they must rectify their mistake. The care sector should not be forced to pay for a Government error – particularly when the future of the sector is in jeopardy.

“Social care has been underfunded and undervalued for years. Now with the sleep-in pay crisis coming to a head, this may well be the final straw which forces disruption to care services throughout the UK if not outright collapse.

“If Government cannot find a solution by September, we are worried that negative effects to care services will increase dramatically.”

Tracy Hammond from Learning Disability England said:

“Care services allow people to live their lives. Any cuts or funding gaps will undoubtedly affect the people they serve.

“Those who depend on care services are already marginalised and this survey proves that the sleep-in pay crisis will result in vulnerable people having less choice and less control over their care – unless a solution is found quickly.

“We urge the Government to fund the back pay liability and ensure proper funding for the care sector moving forward.”

Already the sleep-in pay crisis is affecting care services. According to the survey, providers have decided not to bid or negotiate for 273 new contracts because of their financial situation directly related to sleep-in back pay.

Worryingly, nearly half (46%) of providers who responded to the survey would have to make redundancies, with 19.7% of staff facing redundancy. Those hit hardest by any redundancies would be those occupying front line delivery posts.

This effect on front line staff will undoubtedly hit those cared for.

As one survey respondent stated:

“All I ever wanted to do was make a positive difference and its heart breaking to think what changes may lay ahead for [the people we support].”

Key findings in detail

  • The care sector is drastically underfunded: 67% of those who responded expect to have a budget shortfall in the coming financial period, with 62% planning to fund the shortfall through reserves.  Out of those considering different approaches to address the potential shortfall in funding, 70% are considering a renegotiation of contracts with commissioners, and 56% are considering handing services back.
  • Only half of commissioners of care services are paying NMW for care workers on sleep-in shifts: The results of this survey show that there has been a significant rise in the number of services the commissioners have agreed to fund at the NMW in the last year from 14% to 49%. However, only 7% have agreed to fund sleep-ins at the NMW together with all on-costs.
  • The sleep-in back pay bill will make the majority of care providers unviable: 34% of those surveyed said that there would be a threat to the viability of their organisation if there’s a requirement from HMRC to back date payments to staff for 2 years, with this figure rising to 68% if the requirement is to back date for 6 years (as is required by current government guidance).
  • Providers have not budgeted for the sleep-in back pay: Only 6% of providers have budgeted for back pay liability.
  • Due to the sleep-in pay crisis providers will be forced to sell properties which previously housed disabled people requiring care: 22% of those surveyed said that they would have to sell properties to cover the shortfall.
  • Due to the sleep-in pay crisis providers will be forced to end services in some areas: Providers have decided not to bid or negotiate for 273 new contracts because of their financial situation.

Notes to Editors

  1. The full survey will be posted on www.vodg.org.uk and Solve Sleep In Alliance websites shortly.
  2. Based on a tribunal ruling, recent changes to Government guidance mean that sleep-in staff who previously earned around £30 per shift must be paid minimum wage, with providers liable for six years’ worth of back pay for such shifts. Government typically provides funding for care services through local authorities who then often contract with providers. However, over the past six years contracts between providers and local authorities have not been based on needing to pay NMW/NLW for sleep-in shifts, nor has Government provided that money to local authorities nor to providers – meaning that providers are now liable to pay out money which they have never received. The unexpected bill has been estimated at around £400m for the sector, though may be much higher based on results from this survey, and comes amid an existing financial crisis in social care.
  3. Contact details for media enquires: Casey Calista 07419989055 casey.calista@lodestonecommunications.com

Media and Press Team

VODG (Voluntary Organisations Disability Group)

Visit our website, check out twitter and connect on LinkedIn.


The Care Provider Alliance brings together the main national associations representing social care in England. The Alliance is calling on adult social care providers, from small local services to large national organisations, to share their experience of and views about engagement with Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs).

STPs bring together health and care services in a particular area. Their aim is to improve health and care in practical ways through local collaboration. The Care Provider Alliance fully supports this aim. However, we believe that it will only be achieved if there is full engagement between STPs and adult social care providers.

A short survey has been designed to find out how much engagement there has been so far, and to enable the views of adult social care providers to inform policy development in this critical area.

To complete the survey, please go to www.careprovideralliance.org.uk/survey. Responses are anonymous, and one response is requested per organisation. No prior knowledge is needed.

The deadline for responses is 17.30 on Friday 1st June 2018.


Petition

Fund Universities to explore new routes into Learning Disability Nursing

In order to ensure those with Learning Disabilities receive the best evidence-based care it is vital money is invested into developing new, affordable routes into nurse education to meet the needs of the Learning Disability Student demographic.

More details

Sign this petition

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/218816

 

_________________________________________________________________

GDPR: Subject access requests

In the sixth blog in our series on the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Kate Benefer, employment partner and Emma Banister Dean, partner in our Dispute Resolution team, look at subject access requests and how they can affect your business.

GDPR – What is a subject access request?

Under the GDPR, individuals have a number of rights in relation to their data. One of these is the right of access to their data and to information about how it is being processed. A subject access request is a written request an individual makes to an organisation for this.

Subject access requests are not new. Under the Data Protection Act, individuals have had the right to submit requests for some time.

So what has changed? And what should you do to prepare for a request? With less than a month to go before the GDPR is in force, you should be prioritising GDPR preparation within your organisation. Read our blog to learn what steps towards compliance you need to take now.

Kate Benefer

Partner
T: 01865 268 607
Email me

Emma Banister Dean

Partner
T: 01865 268 370
Email me

At Royds Withy King, we have a specialist GDPR team who are on hand to assist with any of your GDPR queries. We can also offer everything from staff training to a GDPR retainer to help your business get GDPR ready. For more information, access our GDPR hub here.

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.


Citation have a number of FREE TO ATTEND EVENTS in May, use the link below to access details.

HR and Health & Safety business briefings

Citation events_May2018

May 24th – London.

An April update of useful and relevant business related items

T: 0161 667 4000

www.citation.co.uk

Registered Office: Kings Court, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire SK9 5AR, United Kingdom

Find out more about our Referral Scheme >


Need to know more about GDPR? look at the two Citation guides belo, or contact them

GDPR Readiness Assessment_Citation

Citation Free Guide – Is your business GDPR ready

From 25th May 2018, all businesses that handle personal data must comply with GDPR legislation. There’s no denying it’s a hot topic, which can’t be ignored if you don’t want to put yourself at risk of some hefty fines.

We’ve put together a helpful guide, which explains, simply, what’s coming up and what you need to do to make sure you’re ready.

We also have a solution for you, Citations sister company, QMS, are offering GDPR readiness assessments for businesses.

You can see the details on the attached flyer – to find out more please call 0345 241 5250, or email; additionalservices@citation.co.uk


The Care Worker’s Charity


 

 

 

GDPR – handling a breach

In the fifth blog in our series on the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Kate Benefer, an employment partner at Royds Withy King, explores the issue of how to prepare for a potential breach of the GDPR and your obligations in the event of the loss or misuse of data under your control.

How do I prepare to best protect my organisation in the event of a breach?

The best way to prepare is to develop a procedure to follow in the event of a breach and a log to record both the breach and your response to it. In following a calmly thought out procedure, you are far less likely to forget something and expose your organisation to a potential fine. The procedure should be available to all staff and easily accessible 24 hours a day, such as on an intranet.

The best way to prepare is to develop a procedure to follow in the event of a breach and a log to record both the breach and your response to it. In following a calmly thought out procedure, you are far less likely to forget something and expose your organisation to a potential fine. The procedure should be available to all staff and easily accessible 24 hours a day, such as on an intranet.

Do you need to report all breaches to the ICO? What are your obligations when personal data is lost or stolen? Read our blog to learn what steps towards compliance you need to take now.

Kate Benefer

Partner
T: 01865 268 607
Email me

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.


 

 April Employment Law Update

April is just around the corner and there are some important employment law changes you’ll need to be aware of. We’ve rounded them up into an update which you can view here. It includes information on:

  • National Minimum Wage increases
  • Various statutory pay increases (sick pay, maternity and adoption pay etc)
  • The gender pay gap reporting deadline.

T: 0161 667 4000

www.citation.co.uk

Registered Office: Kings Court, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire SK9 5AR, United Kingdom


Chapter 18: Through our eyes: what parents want for their children from health professionals

Jim Blair and parents

Jim Blair

Mary Busk Expert by Parental Experience

Hayley Goleniowska Expert by Parental Experience Simon Hawtrey-Woore Expert by Parental Experience Sue Morris Expert by Parental Experience

Yvonne Newbold Expert by Parental Experience

Stephanie Nimmo Expert by Parental Experience

Introduction

Who knows best? Families of people with learning disabilities, their carers or healthcare professionals? This is a difficult question to answer, but it is certainly true that health professionals as well as those working in social and education settings can only get care and support right when they involve those who have lived experience, namely people with learning disabilities and their families. This chapter focuses on family members, who present here, using their own words

and their own names, their feelings about health services and what changes they would like to see. It is essential that all health professionals gain a clear, focused sense of what it is like to experience health services through the eyes of those who use them.

The challenges and difficulties families face when entering the world of hospitals and health service settings are captured in the following piece by Yvonne, a mother of a child with severe and profound learning disabilities and complex health needs.

What I would wish for

‘Hospitals will always be a part of our family life – it goes with the territory when you have a child with complex needs. Even though I spend several hours, sometimes several days and nights, in hospital every month, I absolutely dread every minute we’re there, and it gets harder with each passing year.

What one thing would make the whole experience more bearable? That’s easy. I wish that every single hospital employee could learn how to truly listen.

Some health professionals barely listen at all. Others appear to listen, but you soon realise that it was only so they could formulate their reply. Occasionally, we meet someone very special who really listens, and with their whole selves, so they even hear what’s left unsaid.

They’re the ones who make magic happen. As well as absorbing our words, they gain a tangible sense of what our lives are really like in a way that parents like me seldom experience. Time stops still while compassionate kindness soothes suffering. In that moment, something profound happens; my sick child becomes the only thing that matters.

You hear and take my concerns seriously, somehow knowing this is my first adult conversation in days. You make me feel like an equal rather than someone less. You understand all I say even though I’m barely talking coherently. You help me make sense of all of my fears. You acknowledge the essence of who my broken, hurting little boy really is, barely noticing his disabilities and equipment. You make a holistic assessment based on quality of life rather than individual symptoms.

When my child doesn’t co-operate with your examination, you ask for and accept my help. I suggest we turn it into a game, you play along enthusiastically.

You offer me a glimpse of the future when all health professionals are like you. When we will all pull together on the same side, working in partnership solely to enhance my child’s life.

I can tell by your eyes that you know the things we haven’t talked about. You recognise my exhaustion and notice how my hair hasn’t seen a comb for a week, but you don’t judge me or make me feel inadequate. You ‘get’ how my life is. A never- ending merry-go-round of sleep-deprivation, of coping with double incontinence, of tube-feeds, of nasal-cannulas, of oxygen-saturation monitors, and of the ever- present vomiting and chest physiotherapy in the middle of the night.

You know how my son’s fragility terrifies me, frightened that his tenuous grip on life could snap at any moment. You feel my guilt that I can’t stop his pain, and you sense how hard I work to keep him alive. You know better than to ask me how I’m coping because you know I’ll always say ‘I’m fine’. You understand that that’s better than me starting to cry and never being able to stop, so we don’t go there. We don’t have to because for that moment, you were already there, with us and for us.’ (Yvonne Newbold is the author of The Special Parent’s Handbook, published in 2014.)

This powerful piece clearly sets out the treadmill effect that is often felt by families when accessing healthcare. It also offers solutions, stating that in order to get it right all health professionals need to:

  • take time to be with the person with a learning disability and their families to understand their lived experiences
  • pick up not only on what is said, but also what is not said, and avoid hurrying the

Getting support and care right

Getting support and care right is not easy, and ensuring that health professionals effectively engage and interact with families and those who love and know the child/person with a learning disability is central to making sure the interaction and outcomes are helpful, accurate and appropriate. Hollins and Hollins (2005), both parents of an adult son who has a learning disability, highlight the need,

as did Yvonne, to first of all listen to parents and other people who love the child or young person. It is vital to remember that doctors and nurses frequently see and get to know a child for a very small number of minutes or hours in any year. Compare that with the amount of time that family members spend together.

Hollins and Hollins ask, who, then, are the experts? It cannot be the health professionals alone. Health professionals must therefore strive to create a strong trusting relationship with families. This requires health professionals to really adopt what Yvonne referred to earlier.

Sometimes families are considered difficult. A so-called ‘difficult’ family is one who doesn’t yet trust health professionals, perhaps because they have had bad experiences with health professionals in the past.

More than a diagnosis

Another element that should be central for health professionals is to always    be mindful that there is more to the child or young person than their medical diagnosis. Human development involves emotional adjustments for every child

and every parent, whether a child is disabled or not. Every individual responds, reacts and interacts in a unique way to difference. Health professionals will be  able to help with these adjustments by respecting and supporting the person with  a learning disability and families to face any difficulties they are experiencing (Hollins & Hollins, 2005). They should make efforts to about find out about the person; who they are, what they like, what they can do and how they contribute to family and social life.

Learning to listen

Words such as ‘respect’ and ‘empower’ give some sense of what should be central to the relationship between healthcare professionals, people with learning disabilities and their families. One part of empowering people is to equip them with the tools to understand what is happening to them in ‘this place, at this time, with these caregivers’. This might include information but, even more importantly, it includes helping them to share their hopes and their fears in whatever way     they can. The Books Beyond Words series tell stories about many health and  social care experiences and can be a powerful way of restoring confidence and hope for people who find pictures easier to understand than words.

In the beginning, the ight

At the start of life with a child with a learning disability it can feel like your life is no longer your own. Stephanie illustrates this clearly and explores a way through it here.

‘In the early days I fought against the system, I fought against the fact that    suddenly your life was not your own, that even 18-year-old student nurses could sit and read notes about your child that you were not allowed to look at. Lives on view for all to see, every emotion, every outburst.

The first lesson I learnt was that when your child is really complicated and has a really rare condition then medicine becomes no more than educated guesswork. The doctors don’t have all the answers, the ones you respect are the ones who will admit that they don’t know what to do and will work with you to find out.

The internet becomes your best friend and your enemy. You spend hours trawling through case studies, trying to find the answer that will help your child. Believe me, as time goes by you don’t go to the internet anymore. It does not have all the answers; your child is unique and while the internet will give you pointers there are no guarantees that treatments that work for others will work for your child.

You do not have to be alone. It took me a long time to realise that. And by talking and opening up to other parents who have walked your path you can gain the benefit of their experience, what they did  that  worked, what  they  wished  they had done.

I have learned time and time again that it is important to have a good relationship with the doctors treating your child. You don’t have to like them, but you have to work with them. I have learned over the years that doctors really do care, even the ones that appear not to, some of them don’t have the best bedside manner; some are very arrogant. Yes, they can go home and switch off, but they all have your child’s best interests at heart and sometimes their views will clash with yours.

This is why taking another person along to meetings, involving a support group, an intermediary, the PALs [patient advice and liaison] service is so important, because at the time in your life when you are dealing with the most extreme of emotions and are so terrified that you may lose your child, you also have to be calm, rational and efficient.’

(Stephanie Nimmo)

Open partnerships

Sue, whose son, Darrell, is 18 years old with a great sense of humour, Down’s syndrome, severe learning disabilities, physical disability, and a variety of complex health and behavioural issues, suggests that parents and health professionals should work in open partnership:

‘As a parent, I would like to see health professionals who see their role as a joint partnership with the parent/carer, to be open when a parent suggests what they think is wrong with their child and looking into those concerns. All people are different and react differently, so do people with learning disability, which is why we need staff in our NHS who can adapt to all our children: one may need space and another may need a lot of interaction. Understand we may have already had the biggest struggle just getting to the appointment, so go easy on us. I have already witnessed over the years how a little banter goes a long way and welcome this with open arms – sometimes we need to laugh to escape the harsh reality.

(Sue Morris)

The need for confident parenting and confident staff

Many parents feel the key to good care and health outcomes is for them and staff to be confident. This is clearly set out in the following piece by Simon.

‘Scarlett is now approaching her 11th birthday, and over those 11 years we have clocked up a whole range of experiences and emotions with the National Health Service. Human nature means that all the early trauma of a premature birth and emerging reality of our darling daughter having global development delay, a hole in her heart and hypothyroidism have faded, and we are able to, for the most part, stay in the present and not think too far ahead or reflect on the past. She’s a very happy, confident little girl who loves people and we feel very blessed.

From our early experience of the medical world trying to support Scarlett, we realised the importance we as parents play in ensuring the quality of care she gets. We have found that we need to be on the front foot and asking the questions and making reasonable requests to ensure the often traumatic experience of hospital treatments goes as well as possible.

Confident parenting and confident staff can make a huge difference to the experience. Where we see the best experience is where Scarlett and I are known and staff communicate well in terms of what adjustments can be made, waiting time expectations and positively engaging with Scarlett rather than through me

  • taking the time to connect with Scarlett as an anxious little girl rather than as just the next At times I have wondered if they even noticed her or her wheelchair. Eye contact even with me isn’t guaranteed at ‘check in’.

Our experiences have been very mixed and there has been very little if any ‘flagging’ [alerts denoting a person has a learning disability placed on the medical records of the person so that adjustments can be made] to date, which I feel would make a huge difference to us

We’ve had to wait three hours in A&E when Scarlett can’t sit still for two minutes; I’ve had my head x-rayed trying to hold Scarlett’s leg still as she freaked out in a cold, dark room; we’ve had a nurse try to get her to read the board in an eye test when she can’t speak or understand the task; and we’ve waited 90 minutes before the staff realised that her notes were still at the main reception. This was despite my regular request for an update.

But then we’ve had amazing experiences at hospital when she has her bloods taken

– a procedure that could be hugely traumatic, but the nurses are amazing with Scarlett. Once we get into the system and are with consultants and nursing staff   who are self-confident and take time to connect with Scarlett, things are 100 times better for all concerned.

One area the majority of clinical staff we have experienced seem to find it hard to relate to, no matter how experienced, is what it’s like journeying through life with     a child with physical and learning disabilities. It’s exhausting. It challenges all relationships in the family unit. It’s relentless. It can feel claustrophobic and it can feel very lonely as the rest of the world gets on regardless. Medical appointments often bring all these emotions together. Even after 11 years I still dread them and   try my upmost for Scarlett not to pick up on this.’

(Simon Hawtrey-Woore)

What needs to change?

Simon has also identified what change is needed:

  • ‘More regular training to build confidence in, and improve awareness of learning disabilities – if in doubt ask, don’t
  • More opportunities for those with learning disabilities to work in the organisation.
  • More training around effective communication with patients and parents with learning
  • Allow more time in the process/system at key moments in the patient pathway – taking time to connect, build trust and work out the best way to communicate is key to successful
  • Ask how best to communicate and check in at regular intervals to maintain the connection/trust.
  • Flag the person’s disability and individual needs ahead of time, all the time, and communicating the difference it makes to parents and patients – it is not just another process or form; it really does make a difference!
  • Think about the context/background of the individual, rather than just seeing the person as the next name on the list – for most patients and parents simply travelling to and from the hospital or GP surgery is a big
  • Support parents with what questions to ask and what to look for/expect – never assume that because some guide has been issued it has reached the parents or patients, is in the right format or has been

And finally …

  • Encourage parent responsibility and support of the clinical staff to help them make connections and communicate effectively with the Emotions run high but a quality care experience is a ‘partnership’ between staff, parent and patient – it’s not an entitlement.’

When health professionals get it right

Health professionals, as Simon and other parents have outlined, can get it right.

The following is Hayley’s experience of being in hospital and the care and support provided by a learning disability nurse. This example illustrates what happens when health professionals get care right.

‘Our youngest daughter, Natty, is eight and has Down’s syndrome, and it was only through a chance meeting at a conference that I met and learned about the role

of learning disability nurses. I immediately made the false assumption that these professionals were on standby to help adults in need of support, and it was only when our daughter was admitted for a routine tonsil and adenoid operation some months later, that I began to wonder if they might be able to help younger patients and their families too.

The team were only too pleased to help and I received a call at home to talk me through my concerns ahead of our daughter’s surgery. I was able to explain my worries about the little patient’s phobia of needles and numbing creams, and her lack of understanding about why she might have to wait long periods of time without eating on the day of her operation. The nurse was able to liaise with the anaesthetist to arrange skipping the pre-med and also advised surgical teams that our daughter should go to theatre as early as possible on the day to avoid uncomfortable situations that she would not be able to deal with mentally.

Not only were these practical matters addressed with ease, but I found someone who understood my fears and worries as a mum, who realised that even minor surgery conjures up memories of more serious surgery in the past, and that however many times our little ones battle on, it doesn’t get any easier for parents. Even my emotional tears on the phone were accepted and eased. My fears were taken seriously and eased considerably, just by having someone with the right experience to lean on. A member of the team made sure to visit us while the surgery was taking place too and we chatted that awful time away.

Learning disability nurses play an invaluable role in hospitals. They remove fear and they make sure procedures and stays go as smoothly as possible. They translate between the families and the consultants, surgeons and managers, as

well as being a vital mouthpiece to communicate the needs of those with learning disabilities.

(Hayley Goleniowska is the founder of Down Side Up and has authored many publications, including Fink Cards, which are discussed later)

Usual rules don’t apply

Mary and her husband have three children, one of whom has severe learning disability, autism, behaviours that challenge, mobility difficulties and other health needs. Mary sets out why usual rules do not apply and that health professionals necessarily have to think differently when working with people with learning disabilities.

‘Our disabled son, Alex, does not look disabled at first glance, but although he is now 15 years old, developmentally he is three, and his language and

communication younger than that. He also weighs 15 stone and is nearly 5 feet 5 inches tall.

Health professionals need to understand children and young people like our son better, and what high quality integrated services should look like for them. Normal rules about diet, expectations of co-operation and so on do not apply. Their needs as a whole person have to be at the centre of planning and understanding. This has to include how they can access health services, including the need for a highly preventative approach, given the range of physical and other health challenges they face and will face in the future, including from obesity.

We first came to the children’s hospital many years ago to seek help from the feeding team because a combination of health issues and autism meant Alex had developed extreme problems eating that were affecting him and our family greatly. The team were very understanding and supportive, and have worked with us to support Alex to widen his range of foods and support weight management. We feel very supported as a family because they care for all the family and they understand Alex very well.

We have recently met the learning disability nurse lead, to resolve practical problems about Alex getting a blood test. As he has got older, bigger and stronger, we are struggling more than ever to get support and understanding in local services for these basic needs. We do not have these problems for our other two non- disabled children. Working with the children’s hospital has helped our family, as there is immediate understanding of the issues; we do not have to beg for help or explain Alex’s needs because they are understood. This has helped us to have less stress and worry, and we can feel more confident about ensuring that basic health needs for Alex are addressed now and in the future.

(Mary Busk)

Being confident and being less stressed are core central components of life for everyone, but for parents of a child with a learning disability, it can be very hard. Parents can help each other and can also guide health professionals as to how  they too can have a positive impact when talking to new parents, such as those of children with Down’s syndrome.

Talking about Down’s syndrome: conversations for new parents

Fink Cards, cards that can be used  to  assist  understanding  and  generate discussion, created by Hayley Goleniowska (2015) are a powerful way to initiate conversations that may be difficult to start. ‘Congratulations on the birth of your new baby,’ is the emphatic welcome message from Hayley to other parents of newly diagnosed babies with Down’s syndrome. Sadly all too often these are not the words that health professionals utter when giving news to parents that their   child has Down’s syndrome. The reality is that it is only an extra chromosome, so keep calm and carry on; yet society still conjures up visions of a future with little    or no hope, worth or purpose for those individuals with Down’s syndrome. How very wrong this is.

How health professionals give news is vital, and all too often the news that a baby has Down’s syndrome is not given in a positive, supportive, fact-based,

humanitarian and focused manner. This is why the more that health professionals know about Down’s syndrome the better. But it is also why a learning disability nurse, as numerous parents advocate, must be more involved  in  delivering  this news, since they are best placed to give a fuller, reality-based account of what Down’s syndrome means as a child grows up and evolves into an adult than other professionals who are not solely qualified to work with people with learning disabilities.

Having Down’s syndrome does not define who Hayley’s daughter Natty is; just in the same way that not having Down’s syndrome does not define her other daughter, Mia. Bob’s (Hayley’s husband and the father of both children) matter of fact approach that all would be fine is not what is usually experienced or expressed by other parents.

These cards – along with the excellent website www.downssideup.com set up by Hayley to enable new parents to see that life will go on – provides vital tips, stories, inspiration and love from her family to others. The cards are separated out into sections:

  • Conversations for new parents – containing tips about how to use the cards, their purpose and very personal supportive messages from Hayley from her own lived
  • Your baby – offers questions for parents to consider, such as, ‘Can you describe your baby in three words?’ ‘Does Down’s syndrome define your baby?’ And, ‘Have you kept your baby’s first outfit?’ These questions, along with others, can be extremely helpful for new parents to make sense of the world they have entered, which is, for many, not the one they once contemplated. They could also enable health and social care professionals to gain a small insight into what is helpful support for parents of babies with Down’s syndrome, since it was created by a parent for other
  • Diagnosis and health – with questions such as, ‘Do other members of the family feel the same as you about your baby’s diagnosis?’ And, ‘What were your first thoughts when you were told your baby has Down’s  syndrome?’ These  cards get to the point quickly and in a focused
  • Support – asks questions such as, ‘Who do you talk to about your fears and worries?’ And ‘Have you been told about any support groups?’ These illustrate how essential it is for new parents as well as health professionals to consider why sharing and support are so pivotal to the early (as well as all) stages of having a child with Down’s
  • Life and relationships – asks, ‘Have you discovered any new friends since your baby was born?’ ‘Do people sometimes say things that hurt your feelings?’ And, ‘How has your relationship with your partner changed since the birth of your baby?’ These and other such searching questions get straight to the core  of the issues facing new parents and these cards provide a thought-provoking   but neutral way of creating a space for individual and familial thoughts.

The Fink Cards are  an  extremely  refreshing  way  for  professionals  to  ensure that they get it right when meeting with and interacting with parents who have     a child with Down’s syndrome. These cards acknowledge that each parent and family member will feel differently when they hear the diagnosis of Down’s syndrome for the first time.

The cards would be very useful for health professionals during their training to assist them in enabling attitudinal change and positive practices to flourish that cherish each child, young person and adult. Books Beyond Words can also be very helpful, especially when preparing a person with a learning disability to go into hospital.

Preparing someone with a learning disability to go into hospital

Preparing people with learning disabilities and their families, carers and supporters to go to hospital is not easy, but there is a useful guide available on the NHS Choices website (see the Useful resources and websites section at the end of the chapter). The Books Beyond Words publication Going into Hospital (Hollins et al, 2015) also includes two stories of people with a learning disability going into hospital and their experiences of what happens. The stories are told through pictures, to enable people with a learning disability, who may read through pictures rather than words, to develop – with the help of a person who knows them well – their understanding of what is likely to happen in hospital. At the back of the book there are tips and guides to getting the right care in hospital, which will prove helpful to people with a learning disability as well

as those supporting them. The Beyond Words website also provides a wealth of information about a variety of health issues in an accessible format (see www. booksbeyondwords.co.uk). These materials can assist in getting things right for people with a learning disability.

How healthcare and support workers can get things right for people with a learning disability accessing healthcare

  • Beware of missing serious illness – don’t ignore medical symptoms by assuming they are part of the person’s Act quickly!
  • Find the best way to communicate – with the person, their families, carers, friends. Not everyone speaks, so use photos, signs, symbols, accessible publications such as the Books Beyond Words series, and pictures alongside
  • The person, their family and carers are experts – they can help interpret signs and behaviours that may show distress or
  • Read and act on the hospital or health passport – these provide vital information about a person’s
  • Assessing someone’s capacity to consent to treatment is dependent on time, decision and
  • Make reasonable adjustments – for example, by finding someone a quieter place to wait and to be seen in, or by minimising waiting times

(Blair, 2013)

In order to ensure care is adjusted to meet a person with learning disabilities’ specific needs a TEACH approach, first developed in Hertfordshire by the Community Learning Disability Team, is required:

Time – take time to work with the person.

Environment – alter the environment to meet the person’s needs, for example, by providing quieter areas, reducing lighting and minimising waiting times.

Attitude – have a positive, solutions-orientated focus.

Communication – find out the best way to communicate with the person and their family, carers and supporters, and also communicate this to colleagues.

Help – consider what help the person and their family, carers and supporters need, and how can you meet these needs.

Conclusion

We can never know what it is like to see through another person’s eyes completely, but health professionals must seek to gain a clear picture of how it is for people with a learning disability, their families, carers and supporters. The most effective change and help is often created by those with lived experience. Too frequently health and social care professionals choose not to appreciate what a wealth of knowledge, understanding and expertise parents have. It is only through really engaging parents, families and people with learning disabilities in the education    of health and social care professionals, service planning, design and evaluation  will we truly experience services that are effective, responsive, well led, safe and caring.

Summary points

Every person is an individual and unique. Each interaction and contact has to count. Health professionals do need to think differently and act creatively together with the person with a learning disability and their families. In order to get care right, health professionals need to:

  • Dedicate time to being with the person with a learning disability and their families to tune into their lived
  • Take a whole person approach, not just looking at the
  • Tap into how the person with a learning disability communicates, interacts and usually
  • Listen to parents and other people who love the child, young person or
  • Invest time and energy, not just for the moment but for the future as
  • Pick up on what is and is not said and avoid hurrying the

References

Blair J (2013) Everybody’s life has worth: getting it right in hospital for people with an intellectual disability and reducing clinical risks. Clinical Risk 19 58–63.

Goleniowska H (2015) Talking about Down’s Syndrome: Conversations for new parents by Fink Cards.

Hollins S & Hollins M (2005) You and your child: making sense of learning disabilities. London: Karnac Books.

Hollins S, Avis A, Cheverton S & Blair J (2015) Going into Hospital. London: Books Beyond Words. Newbold Y (2014) The Special Parent’s Handbook. Poole: Amity Books by CMP (UK).

Useful websites and resources

British Institute of Learning Disabilities (BILD) www.bild.org.uk

The institute helps develop the organisations that provide services, and the people who give support.

Books Beyond Words www.booksbeyondwords.co.uk

Publishes accessible stories in pictures to help people with learning and communication disabilities explore and understand their own experiences.

Disability Matters www.disabilitymatters.org.uk

An e-learning resource to enhance understanding and skills of staff.

Down’s Side Up www.downsideup.com

Gently changing perceptions of Down’s Syndrome.

Easyhealth www.easyhealth.org.uk

Provides over 250 free accessible leaflets, health guides and videos.

Mencap http://www.bacdis.org.uk/policy/documents/Gettingitright.pdf

A group of organisations working towards better healthcare, well-being and quality of life for people with a learning disability.

NHS Choices, Going into Hospital with a Learning Disability http://www.nhs. uk/Livewell/Childrenwithalearningdisability/Pages/Going-into-hospital-with- learning-disability.aspx

Information on preparing a person with a learning disability for hospital.

University of Hertfordshire http://www.intellectualdisability.info/ Understanding learning disability and health

Other useful reading

Blair J (2015) To Know or Not to Know: Being alert – why it helps to know in advance if your next patient has a learning disability. Available at: http://theqni. tumblr.com/post/129772074291/to-know-or-not-to-know-being-alert-why-it-helps

Blair J (2015) Changing Culture, Shaping Care: Getting care right for people with learning disabilities. Available at: http://theqni.tumblr.com/post/126087501176/ changing-culture-shaping-care-getting-care-right


LEARNING DISABILITIES

DIAGNOSTIC OVERSHADOWING: SEE BEYOND THE DIAGNOSIS

In this article, Jim Blair looks at ways of ensuring key health issues are not overlooked in people with learning disabilities

Jim Blair

Consultant Nurse Learning Disabilities Great Ormond Street Hospital, Associate Professor Learning Disabilities Kingston and St.George’s Univeristies

Healthcare settings are strange, unfamiliar places.

We only tend to go to them when we are unwell either physically or mentally, so finding your way through what can seem like a maze is hard.

For people with learning disabilities it can seem a petrifying environment within which to make sense of what is happening. These same feelings are frequently experienced by health professionals when seeking

to assess, treat and ensure safe reasonable care takes place for people with learning disabilities.

Too often, the training undertaken by clinical staff has not prepared them for working with people with learning disabilities in these constantly high-pressure environments.1 This is particularly pertinent to general healthcare where staff in those settings have “very limited knowledge about learning disability. They

are unfamiliar with the legislative framework, and commonly fail to understand that a right to equal treatment does not mean treatment should be the same, but rather may need to be adapted to meet special needs.”2

This article sets out ways of reducing clinical risks such as diagnostic overshadowing, ensuring that health professional see the person and not just their disability. Diagnostic overshadowing occurs when

a health professional makes the assumption that a person with learning disabilities’ behaviour is a part of their disability without exploring other factors such as biological determinants. Diagnostic overshadowing has been defined as “..once a diagnosis is made of a major condition there is a tendency to attribute all other problems to that diagnosis, thereby leaving other co-existing conditions undiagnosed.”3

In relation to people with a learning disability Emerson and Baines (2010) highlighted that it means “Symptoms of physical ill health are mistakenly attributed to either a mental health/behavioural problem or as being inherent in the person’s learning disabilities.”4 Gates and Barr (2009) noted that diagnostic overshadowing is particularly pertinent when new behaviours develop or existing ones increase.5 Given that people with learning disabilities have a much higher risk of experiencing a variety of diseases and conditions it is vital that physiological or pathological determinants in behaviour change are explored. If they are not, people with learning disabilities can suffer poor care and may even die

when their death could be avoided. Gastrointestinal cancers are approximately twice as prevalent in people with a learning disability, coronary heart disease is the second highest cause of death for people with a learning disability and approximately 70% of people with a learning disability experience gastrointestinal disorders.6

The Confidential Inquiry into the Premature Deaths of People with a Learning Disability (CIPOLD)7 highlighted that people with a learning disability have far worse health outcomes than those in the general population. These include:

  • Reduced access to, and less likely to receive, interventions for their obesity, including screening for thyroid disease and diabetes
  • Greater risk of death from amenable causes (avoidable due to medical intervention)
  • Variance (approximately 48%) in amenable death rates in the non-learning disabled population
  • Low take-up for national cancer screening programmes, for example, breast, bowel and cervical
  • Low uptake of immunisations such as ‘flu vaccinations
  • Increased risk of death due to respiratory infection – one of the highest causes of amenable death.

CIPOLD7 also found that women with a learning disability die on average 20 years younger than women who did not have a learning disability and men some 13 years younger than their non- learning disabled counterparts. Some of the most consistent reasons were:

  • Delays or problems with diagnosis or treatment
  • Problems with identifying needs
  • Difficulty providing appropriate care in response to changing needs.

No health professional seeks to discriminate against his or her patient, but the evidence illustrates that people with learning disabilities have poorer health outcomes than the rest of the population. A central

34 | January/February 2017 |

LEARNING DISABILITIES

component in the health professional and patient relationship is creating trust and rapport. However, if the patient has difficulty communicating and being understood by others this development can take time and effort – not something every health professional feels able or willing to give. If this does not happen and human connection is not acquired then health professionals can easily slide into the trap of diagnostic overshadowing and thereby, often unwittingly, fail to apply the same diagnostic principles that they would afford others.8

Diagnostic overshadowing can occur during  an assessment, such as when a health professional

interprets a person with a learning disability rubbing their heads as a behaviour linked to their learning disability and fails to investigate any possible underlying health cause. Another example is when

a person with a learning disability who has a pre- exisiting condition such as a gall bladder problem, develops a mental health problem and the initial health issue is no longer considered as health professionals can get blinded by the mental health concerns and forget the other health need. This can lead to avoidable deaths, as if undetected or under monitored a gall bladder problem can result in it bursting and excess toxins entering the blood stream with fatal effect. It is vital to always explore a physical or psychological reason behind a behaviour change or a new behaviour.

Key points to eliminate diagnostic overshadowing

  • Be respectful. Don’t make assumptions about a person’s quality of life. Treat the patient in a way that is appropriate to their chronological age
  • Respect confidentiality, as for any other patient
  • Always communicate with the patient directly.If a person does not use verbal language to communicate, use pictures like the ones in the Books Beyond Words series, photos, symbols, sign etc to engage with them
  • Assess people’s health and wellbeing so that any changes in behaviour that may signify changes in condition or an illness are not attributed to their learning disability
  • Pay close attention to non-verbal communication, for example sounds, body positions, facial gestures and other non-verbal signs that may indicate pain, anxiety and discomfort
  • Be aware of the physical setting and how you can adjust it to support the patient’s access, comfort and safety
  • Understand the issues around gaining consent clearly, and make every effort to gain consent
  • Seek out help from people who know the patient best and engage with family or supporters to help you communicate effectively with them. This may help you get to know the person and understand what is in their best interests if they lack capacity to consent
  • Ensure that the lines of communication with the patient, their family carers, advocates or supporters are clearly established throughout throughout the healthcare journey
  • Always liaise with Community Learning Disability Team colleagues such as community learning disability nurses and other community health professionals to support admission and discharge for hospital, or if someone with a learning disability does not turn up for an 9

Conclusion

As health professionals we can all be guilty of making assumptions about people we see. But once we see the person and experience their abilities we can realise our assumptions were ill-founded. As noted earlier many health professionals have had limited opportunities to experience during their formative training how to work and get to know people with

a learning disability and how rich their lives are.  We need to ensure that more is done to remedy this. There are pockets of good practice where people with a learning disability, family members, carers and supporters are involved in teaching, design and

evaluation of health professionals and services within which they work but much more needs to be done.

Once this has become commonplace then there will be an end to diagnostic overshadowing and an

increase in positive health experiences, outcomes and a significant reduction in avoidable deaths of people with a learning disability.

References                                                                  

  1. Blair , Clinical Risk, vol 19 pp58-63, (2013)
  2. Independent Inquiry into Access to Healthcare for People with Learning Disabilities. ‘Healthcare for all?’ London: Aldridge, 2008, p.7.
  3. Neurotrauma Law Nexus http://www.neurolaw.com/ neuroglossary/ accessed on 4.16.
  4. Emerson E., Baines. S., (2010) Improving Health and Lives: Learning Disability Observatory https://www. org.uk/uploads/doc/vid_7479_ IHaL2010-3HealthInequality2010.pdf accessed 12.4.16.
  5. Gates B and Barr Learning and intellectual disability nursing. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.
  6. Blair , British Journal of Family Medicine March/April 2016 pp37-41 (2016).
  7. Heslop , Blair P., Fleming P., et al. Confidential inquiry into premature deaths of people with learning disabilities (CIPOLD). Bristol: Norah Fry Research Centre, 2013.
  8. General Medical Council ‘Discriminationhttp://www.gmc- org/learningdisabilities/200.aspx accessed 12.4.16
  9. Hollins , Avis A., Cheverton S., Blair J., (2015) Going into Hospital. 2nd Edition London: Books Beyond Words.

 


Refocusing: what you see

isn’t all there is – getting healthcare right in hospitals for autistic and learning disabled people

Jim Blair

Mary Busk, expert by parental experience

Simon Hawtrey-Woore, expert by parental experience Ismail Kaji, expert by lived and parental experience Ciara Lawrence, expert by lived experience

Gail Moody, expert by parental experience Yvonne Newbold, expert by parental experience Lauretta Ofulue, expert by parental experience

Being autistic and learning disabled means travelling through the maze of life that is geared towards people who are neither, and this can be very difficult. The multi- sensory stimulations, lights, noise and apparent endless questions, as well as misinterpretations of what is being communicated and what is being received, frequently make the world a challenging place with which to engage.

Traversing healthcare systems and structures is hard for many of us. It can be like reading instructions in a language you do not understand and being expected to follow the  set route, whether or not it suits you, in order to attend the appointment that is booked in your name.

The voice of experience

This chapter will focus on seeking to reset the lens for health professionals and others to enable them to gain insight into how to ensure each encounter is a positive one leading to better experiences and care outcomes. The voice of experts by lived and parental experience are throughout the chapter acting as guides in how to get care right. When the recipient

of healthcare is using forms of communication other than speech, the practitioner will need to pay close, patient and careful attention and take their lead from the individual and the people who know them best.

Ciara has a learning disability and works at Mencap, here she talks about what is important to her when interacting with health services.

‘Having accessible information understanding what is being said to me. I get anxious….I need reassurance of what is going to happen. It is hard in dentists and

hospitals. I have a learning disability they need to be clear with me need to be consistent. I asked for reasonable adjustments and then I got them…being able to say how I felt. This was when I had a wisdom tooth taken out. I saw the chair and had a meltdown. The dentist said do you want to have it today or come in another time and we will put you to sleep. That was a positive experience. A small thing to make a big impact like having my mother with me when I had a GA [general anaesthetic].’

Refocusing: what you see isn’t all there is – getting healthcare right in hospitals for autistic and learning disabled people

Ciara talked about how small things can make all the difference. Ismail has had some similar experiences to Ciara, both as a man who has a learning disability and as a father of young children.

‘Health staff need to change attitudes, way they speak not jargon medical terms speak slowly…think about how the person/parent is feeling…communicate with patients. Don’t rush things. Remember people will

be nervous. Explain things in order it is difficult to remember things. It is helpful to use visual examples like pictures, showing what could be used….and then checking understanding. I would like to call after to check what was said because I forget what was said.’

The complexities of navigating healthcare services and settings can be very traumatic for autistic individuals with learning disabilities and their parents. There are however occasions when things go very well, but experience would suggest that this is not always at the start of the journey.

Pain cannot always be seen but that does not mean it is not felt

Lauretta illustrates how her four-year-old learning disabled autistic son, Otito, appears to express pain in ‘atypical’ ways. Here she discusses experiences with Otito when he was in hospital with pancreatitis.

‘The pain charts recorded higher scores for pain based on normal responses. For example screaming, being irritable and displaying active movements especially kicking to show pain was ranked highly. They could

not justify the need to give the level of pain relief I was requesting since the pain scores they charted did not support my claim.

However, given his status as a severely autistic child with learning disabilities it was really not far-fetched. As time went by my son became very withdrawn.

While what the health professionals saw was more of a quiet boy, what I saw was less of my child and more of a chronic patient. To them his quietness was only a confirmation that he was after all unwell.

The learning disability nurse was very helpful and approachable. I was able to discuss my concerns easily with him. It was relieving to find someone – a health professional who finally understood my son’s plight. He simply got it! The pain responses that I described to him were anything but alien. In fact he said it was quite common with children who had the level of autism that Otito possessed. It was also a relief to know that my son was neither alone nor was his case beyond redemption. The new pain document accommodated my son’s unique responses to pain.

Things (like being quiet, curling up in a foetal position, not moving around, staying in corners, grinding his teeth, closing his eyes even while awake, interacting less with people or toys etc) that were previously being overlooked were not only taken into account but in fact given higher scores using the new pain score sheet. It helped the doctors understand my son better. By using this new pain score sheet they could also justify the

need for a higher level of pain relief (something that was also an important requirement for dispensing them).’

Seeing the whole person – the hospital passport

Being able to understand a person is essential in order to know how to meet their needs. Lauretta suggests that hospital passports can play a central role in this process.

The hospital passport shaped a better experience of hospital care for Otito and has been effective for others.

‘The learning disability nurse also made us aware of something called a “hospital passport”. By the time I had filled out a “hospital passport” for him, it served  as a well-documented description of nearly everything pertaining to my son. It was also an introductory piece of document that saved a lot of time by acquainting Health Care Professionals with my son’s unique characteristics before an actual interaction.

I was able to record everything from important information (like my son’s name, date of birth, hospital number, NHS number, his weight, his height) to seemingly less important information (like his mealtimes, his sleep times, bath times, walk times) and silly information (like his favourite toy – for example his tablet, and the need to make sure it always had power, the things that worked – for example giving him his toy stethoscope before carrying out observations, things you must never do – for example administer his medicines without showing him the tray). I was also able to include many of the less important but routine activities that could set him off if not followed to the letter.

As a severely autistic child understanding and applying information about all these activities were sometimes the difference between a good and bad day for Otito. These were the things he understood. They also provided him with stability and kept him feeling safe. Having the “hospital passport” was a relief to me as a parent because not only could I have a copy, I could leave one in his hospital file.’

Our NHS learning disability autism success story – a dental experience

Yvonne describes here a successful encounter with the NHS with her son Toby, a young man who has autism and severe learning disabilities.

‘Of all the squillions of NHS appointments that we’ve clocked up over the years, seeing his dentist has to be the least stressful and the most enjoyable.

However, Toby doesn’t really make it easy for them. His favourite moment is always if he’s able to outwit them and take control of the chair moving buttons himself.

Toby is profoundly disabled, and he has the cognitive functioning level of a neuro-typical two year old. He is nonverbal, he has autism and he also has extreme oral sensitivity issues. He was tube fed completely until he was a teenager, and so he finds it almost impossible

Refocusing: what you see isn’t all there is – getting healthcare right in hospitals for autistic and learning disabled people to tolerate anything in his mouth, nor does he have the comprehension to understand why co-operating with the dentist is a good idea.

They [the dental team] ask for our help and then welcome it to keep Toby relaxed and happy throughout the appointment singing his favourite songs, letting

him watch Mr Tumble on his iPad. They just “get it”. They understand that people with learning disabilities or autism or both can perceive everything just that little bit differently. They know that trying to reason with Toby, or getting stern and officious, will simply

not work. Most of all, they grasp that …the whole time Toby is the most important person in the room.

Toby has a very traumatic medical history stretching right back to when he was born. Most of his first

six years were spent in hospital, and it was never expected he’d ever survive more than a few more weeks. None of us dared hope that we’d ever have him long enough to celebrate his 22nd birthday, which we did earlier this year.

Although his health is no longer as volatile as it once was – cannulating Toby is never easy, and now that he’s bigger and stronger and able to resist much more, we weren’t even sure if they’d be able to manage to sedate him. Of course we also knew that we would be meeting a new team, people we didn’t know and who didn’t know Toby. Another concern was that Toby now lives in a care home which can make my role as his no-longer-full-time-carer an awkward one, particularly with a new team who don’t know Toby.

The appointment went wonderfully well. Two of the three staff members had never met Toby before, but that didn’t matter because they understood how essential it is to make him feel important. They asked me questions, they involved all of us in Toby’s care, and they made him feel welcome, happy and valued. They listened to any of our suggestions and then they followed them. Everything was about Toby and making it work well for him. They even chose to start the sedation process with nasal Midazolam, to cut down any distress caused by vein hunting with needles.

Toby can’t talk so he has no way of telling us if he had toothache. He could be in excruciating pain and although his behaviour might indicate that he was in some way unwell, it would take us days, weeks or even longer to ascertain that it was tooth related. Even once we had worked it out, he wouldn’t co-operate with a full dental examination, and it would take a

lot of further planning and preparation to admit him to hospital for dental work under anaesthetic. Now, for the first time in his life, I have the reassurance of knowing that every six months minor problems will almost certainly be picked up before they escalate into full-scale extremely painful toothache.’

‘Why isn’t there a designated and highly trained team of learning disability specialists available for blood tests or X-rays or A & E admissions? Why can’t every NHS team understand the importance of including the family

and carers in every care-based decision regarding people with learning disabilities? Why can’t every NHS appointment for Toby be long enough to work at gaining his trust and getting the best possible level of co-operation from him?’

Four simple steps could make all the difference

Yvonne Newbold suggests four straightforward steps to improve access to healthcare (http://yvonnenewbold.com/ our-nhs-learning-disability-success-story/). She also offered her services to educate health practitioners. Her four suggestions are:

‘1. Involve the families and carers in all learning disability care.

  1. Actively invite and listen to suggestions and ideas from families and carers, and then follow their
  2. Factor in extra time at every
  3. Ensure all staff have the patience, kindness, understanding and training to work with anyone with a learning

The four steps to getting it right as outlined by Yvonne are simple, but as her story of Toby’s experience shows, they can be highly effective.

Simon and Mary continue the theme in their reflections on what works well for Simon’s daughter Scarlett and Mary’s son Alex.

Understand what makes someone tick

Scarlett is 11 years old and has severe learning disabilities and multi-sensory processing difficulties. Having a hospital appointment can be frightening, but for patients with a learning disability and who are autistic, this is magnified due to their difficulty with interpreting, making sense of and accepting what’s going on.

Simon explains:

‘Scarlett has no attention span and has sensory sensitivity. She can’t filter anything out, so when she goes onto a ward, she is overwhelmed by the people, machines, colours and noises.’

Tapping into the knowledge of parents and supporters is vital in order to tune into the individual and to see the whole picture.

Reflections on what works: understanding the whole picture

Mary:

‘Alex, our severely learning disabled son with autism, is now 17. Our best experiences of healthcare have been when people have cared about us and about Alex. Learning disability nurses have been a highlight because we have not had to explain Alex to them.

They have understood his communication, behaviour and health needs instinctively.

Refocusing: what you see isn’t all there is – getting healthcare right in hospitals for autistic and learning disabled people

Alex’s ear nose throat (ENT) surgery when he was younger was good because we were able to get the right medical care for his needs. Getting grommits and having his tonsils and adenoids removed greatly improved his overall health. Before that he was chronically sick and lived on antibiotics. We explained to medical professionals that as our son had such severe problems with language and communication for example, we wanted his physical health to be as good as possible. Otherwise coping with very poor health would make efforts to develop his language, communication and learning much harder. They understood this. That personal understanding and empathy from the ENT consultant in particular meant that we could call on him when other crises arose

as he got older. That is because that consultant understood the whole picture for our son, that he could not speak or indicate pain or say what the matter was.’

The possible becoming impossible then possible again

‘As Alex got older we thought things would get easier but they became more difficult. The possible became impossible – such as blood tests and cooperating with many procedures. A poor experience of our son being asked to leave a hospital because he was considered a health and safety risk eventually became a positive experience. With the support of a learning disability nurse he had a number of procedures done at once and we arranged for sedation before and on admission to hospital.’

Always a person – it’s a principle and a right

‘We have sensed sometimes that because our son cannot speak that somehow he seems to be less of a person to some people. This leads to our need to advocate strongly for the best possible care for our son as we would expect for ourselves and everyone else. A second key principle is to have a preventative and early intervention approach so ensuring that health issues do not develop. A third key principle is that his needs should be met with the right services. For example Alex still needs therapy input from physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech

and language therapy to ensure that he is able to communicate, develop good physical health and manage his sensory needs as well as possible.’

The issues raised and reflected on by Mary are essential in order to provide care in health settings that effectively meet the needs of autistic people with a learning disability and their families.

Gail discusses some key issues in relation to how good  care is not about fitting people into the system but making adaptations. Gail is the mother of a young teenage girl with multiple sensory and processing issues as well as numerous health challenges.

One size does not fit all – good experiences

Gail:

‘A good experience for any child with a learning disability is one that is child centred, inclusive and as individualised as the setting allows. A situation in which the health workers understand and respect the fact that just because different children may have the same

disability doesn’t mean that a ‘one size fits all’ approach is either acceptable or workable.

Generally small adjustments in the way the clinics, wards etc. are run when combined with education about and an understanding of generally acceptable codes of practice will make the visits as positive and manageable as possible for all concerned.

An example of a positive and productive hospital visit is: the staff had read my daughter’s personal passport and were aware of her complex needs and the best way in which to approach her. She is deaf/blind, has multi- sensory impairment and Down’s syndrome amongst other things. The staff were aware of her sensory issues and were mindful of not overcrowding her and offered her a quiet space if that would make the whole experience both more accessible and more tolerable for her. The consultant actually asked how close he needed to get so that she could see him talking to her! He also took time to listen to her questions and answered her rather than talk directly to me. This made her feel totally included and a valued part of the whole process, that she could make a decision about what was happening to her rather than simply being the person to whom things were done.’

What would health professionals benefit from knowing and doing?

� Listen to the parents, they are the experts in their children.

� Know the distance at which they can safely interact with the child, young person or adult whilst still respecting their space.

� Understand that it is not appropriate to approach people from behind and surprise them with a hand on their shoulder.

� Be aware that many people with learning disabilities and autism find it almost impossible to filter out sensory stimulation.

Ismail and Ciara came up with the following points:

� Understand the person.

� Be patient and calm.

� Be supportive in the best way for that person.

� Adjust your thinking and focus.

� Know that small things make a big difference.

� Build in extra time.

� Give clear instructions.

� Avoid jargon.

Refocusing: what you see isn’t all there is – getting healthcare right in hospitals for autistic and learning disabled people

Reference

� Break things down – what is going to happen, when, how and who will be involved?

T.E.A.C.H

In order to ensure care is adjusted to meet a person with learning disabilities’ specific needs, a TEACH approach, first developed in Hertfordshire by the community learning disability team, is required:

Time – take time to work with the person.

Environment – alter the environment to meet the person’s needs, for example, by providing quieter areas, reducing lighting and minimising waiting times.

Attitude – have a positive, solutions-orientated focus.

Communication – find out the best way to communicate with the person and their family, carers and supporters, and also communicate this to colleagues.

Help – consider what help the person and their family, carers and supporters need, and how can you meet these needs.

(Blair et al, 2016)

Conclusion

Small differences can lead to big changes which can escalate if carried out by many people on numerous occasions. Big changes in how autistic people with a learning disability access and experience healthcare can and should be informed by stakeholders, including the patient and their family.

Blair et al (2016) identified the following simple steps:

� Take time to be with the person and their families to understand their lived experiences.

� Pick up not only on what is said, but also what is not said, and avoid hurrying the interaction.

It is essential to remember the every interaction counts and each contact matters. Health professionals only spend a fraction of time with a person, so it is vital to gain as much insight as possible from the person and those who know them best, and to consider all that is being relayed, verbally and nonverbally. In doing so, healthcare practitioners can refocus how they interpret what they see and develop their understanding that what is seen superficially is not all that there is.

Blair J, Busk M, Goleniowska H, Hawtrey-Wore S, Morrus S, Mewbols Y & Nimmo S (2016) Through our eyes: what parents want for their children from health professionals. In: S Hardy, E Chaplin and P Woodward (Eds) Supporting the Physical Health Needs of People with Learning Disabilities (pp197–212). Brighton: Pavilion Publishing and Media Ltd.

Useful websites and resources

British Institute of Learning Disabilities (BILD)

www.bild.org.uk

The institute helps develop the organisations that provide services, and the people who give support.

Books Beyond Words

www.booksbeyondwords.co.uk

Publishes accessible stories in pictures to help people with learning and communication disabilities explore and understand their own experiences.

Disability Matters

www.disabilitymatters.org.uk

An e-learning resource to enhance understanding and skills of staff.

Down’s Side Up

www.downsideup.com

Gently changing perceptions of Down’s syndrome.

Easyhealth

www.easyhealth.org.uk

Provides over 250 free accessible leaflets, health guides and videos.

Mencap

http://www.bacdis.org.uk/policy/documents/Gettingitright.pdf

A group of organisations working towards better healthcare, well-being and quality of life for people with a learning disability.

NHS Choices, Going into Hospital with a Learning Disability http://www.nhs. uk/Livewell/Childrenwithalearningdisability/Pages/Going-into-hospital- withlearning-disability.aspx

Information on preparing a person with a learning disability for hospital.

University of Hertfordshire http://www.intellectualdisability.info/ Understanding learning disability and health.

Other useful reading

Blair J, Anthony T, Gunther I, Hambley Y, Harrison N, Lambert N & Stuart C (2017) A protocol for the preparation of patients for theatre and recovery. Learning Disability Practice 20 (2) 22–26.

Blair J (2017) What you see isn’t all there is…understanding people with learning disabilities and health issues. Care Talk 62 June 17 12.

Blair J (2017) Diagnostic overshadowing: see beyond the diagnosis.

British Journal of Family Medicine Jan/Feb 17 34–35.

 


The Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman

Annual care provider survey

We are launching our annual survey for independent adult social care providers.

We want to know more about how care providers view, and use, the learning from our investigations to help improve adult social care services.

This survey is only for people who work for, or run, an independent care provider. Or those from a care provider representative body.

If you do, we would love to hear from you.

Please email us, to receive the survey. We will be sending it out in the coming days.

I am a care provider – please email me your survey

 


Debt recovery: what is the actual cost?

Whatever sum you are owed, our Debt Recovery team has years of experience in successfully recovering outstanding debts for businesses. Our debt recovery service is suitable for recovering multiple undisputed invoice debts of any size.

How much does it actually cost?

Don’t just trust our words – trust our numbers. We have prepared a few examples to illustrate what sums we recover and what the actual cost to our clients is.

Example 1 On 21 November 2017, we were instructed to recover an undisputed debt of £1,900 (incl. VAT). The invoice was dated 28 July 2017. There is no contractual right to interest in the client’s Terms & Conditions or contractual right to legal costs. Payment was due within 14 days of the invoice date.  The client is VAT registered.
A letter of claim was issued on the 21 November 2017, claiming the debt plus interest and late payment compensation under statutory provisions. The total sum claimed was £2,072. The debtor settled the debt in full upon receipt.

What are our charges?

Letter of Claim costs – £15 plus VAT
A Recovery Fee of 6% of £1,900 – £114 plus VAT

Total cost £129 plus VAT – £154.80.

What is the actual cost to the client?

If the client is entitled to recover the VAT elements and offsets the net costs from the additional sums recovered, the client has recovered its debt in full and is up by £43.

View / download more business to business debt recovery examples

How effective is the service? Our latest calculation showed that 65% of debts
that we had handled through the system were paid after sending the letter of claim. A further 20% were paid after proceedings had been issued.

If you would like to learn more about the process and how your business could benefit, please do not hesitate to contact me.

With kind regards,

Marianne Johns
Head of Debt Recovery team

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.


Health & Safety and HR support – discounted just for you

You’d do anything to protect your business. But with funding issues and increasing overheads, every penny counts, right?

We understand that budgets are at the forefront of most care providers’ minds, which is why we’d like to offer you a 20% discount* off our Health & Safety, HR and CQC compliance services.

What’s included?

  • Bespoke contracts of employment and employee handbooks
  • Detailed Health & Safety documents
  • 24/7 access to experienced care experts
  • Up-to-date reminders on legislation changes
  • Annual Health & Safety inspections
  • Access to our online management platform – Atlas
  • CQC Pro – our online regulatory compliance tool

Plus, much, much more

FIND OUT MORE

For a limited time only

This 20% discount* is available exclusively to care providers, and expires at the end of March.

Don’t miss out! To find out more, simply call 0345 844 1111 and quote CARE20, or click here and fill out the form to request a call back from one of our experts

Discount applicable on new appointments sat between 9th March 2018 and 30th March 2018.
*Full terms and conditions apply. Ask your sales representative for more information.


Don’t forget that New National Minimum Wage/Living Wage rates come into effect in April. Make sure you’re up-to-date with the changes. See details below on the ACAS website

View April changes 

Acas have further guidance and resources available:

Pay       Pay deductions       Tips and gratuities      Contracts of employment

Help for small firms: handling pay and wages


 

Health+Care 2018

27th-28th June at ExCel London

Building a Better Future for Care

a world class conference and exhibition, free to attend, for complimentary admission visit

www.healthpluscare.co.uk/caa

or telephone 020 7348 1867


Getting ready for the GDPR – what should you be doing now?
London, 7 March 2018
Take our online quiz | Book onto our briefing

It’s just 100 days until the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into effect on 25 May. With the clock well and truly ticking, time is running out for businesses to plan and implement the changes you will need to make to comply.

Test your GDPR knowledge

Take our online GDPR quiz to find out how much you already know about your GDPR obligations and decide on your critical next steps and how our experts might be able to support you

Attend our GDPR briefing

Click here to book your place at our GDPR breakfast briefing on Wednesday 7 March in our London office to find out more about what you need to be focusing on to become GDPR compliant in the coming weeks.

•  an overview of the GDPR
•  some of the key differences with the existing regime
•  practical steps you should be taking to comply
•  the penalties and risks of non-compliance.

The briefing will be an open forum that will provide you with an opportunity to ask questions and share your experiences.

Click here to book your place

When; Wednesday 7 March 2018

Where
Royds Withy King office
69 Carter Lane
London
EC4V 5EQ

Timings
8.00am – Registration & networking
8.30am – Briefing & discussion
9.30am – Further networking

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2018
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.


VODG (Voluntary Organisations Disability Group) represents over 80 leading voluntary and charity social care disability provider organisations. Its members work with around a million disabled people, employ more than 85,000 staff and have a combined annual turnover in excess of £2.8 billion.

Social care needs to transform itself to become fit for the future

Social care providers must adopt new approaches if they are to survive the challenges of funding cuts and policy changes, according to a new publication released today.

The VODG discussion paper, Challenges can fuel change, outlines what social care providers believe are the future hopes for the sector as well as the barriers that block progress. The publication is a contribution to Civil Society Futures, the national independent inquiry into English civil society.

Based on the views of VODG members, the paper argues that voluntary social care organisations must adapt to be sustainable. By 2025, there will be 11.7m disabled people living in England, compared to today’s 11 million today. Cumulative adult social care cuts since 2010 have amounted to £6.3 billion, more savings are planned and the recent cash injection for social care in the local government funding settlement is only a temporary solution. Meanwhile the retrospective requirement for providers to fund national minimum wage/living wage back pay to sleep-in shift workers would be financially disastrous for many providers and Brexit is a threat to labour supply.

However, the paper argues, voluntary adult social care sector could be stronger if disabled people were more involved in decision-making. For example, providers could enable people supported to articulate their own demands for social care to government, arguing for better funding and support for high quality care.

The paper includes other hopes and solutions for the sector:

  • social care providers could come to be regarded as an independent “counterbalance” to the establishment
  • organisations that adopt a cooperative model might shift the balance of power and collaborate better with people supported
  • technology offers huge potential to complement support services
  • change is possible if commissioners encourage innovation and a less risk-averse approach

Challenges can fuel change also describes problems faced by providers, including:

  • organisations that receive statutory funding are often reluctant to put their heads above the parapet to criticise central and local government
  • increased bureaucracy – like multiple guidance and frameworks or local authorities retaining power through controlling personal budgets
  • commissioning that is “system focused, not person centred”, encouraging cost-cutting rather than creative approaches to care

Today’s report follows VODG’s previous work on exploring how charities can become more sustainable and how social care leaders might develop the sector in turbulent times.

VODG chief executive Dr Rhidian Hughes said:

“Social care organisations have no choice but to transform, from embracing new technology to adopting new approaches to working with people and their families. We’re all operating in difficult times, but given the positive ethos and founding missions of voluntary sector organisations, it is clear to see how action could be sparked by the challenges we face.”


When did you last review your fire safety systems?

Fire damages property, closes down care homes, causes injury and takes lives.

In June last year, the Chief Executive of CQC wrote to all care providers to further highlight the importance of fire safety, and asked them to review their processes. What have you done to review your systems since?

You have a legal responsibility to regularly service your fire devices and have an up to date fire risk assessment – and that’s where we come in.

As well as our overall Health & Safety systems, we offer legally compliant Fire Risk Assessments, Fire Alarm and Extinguisher Servicing and Emergency Lighting Testing.

FIND OUT MORE

Don’t just take our word for it

“Citation are a company that cares about us, and cares about our business”

Our five star Trustpilot rating is just one of the reasons we know how much our clients value our support.

But don’t just take our word for it.

Watch our video, where Clive Weir, Director of Boars Tye Residential Care Home, tells us just how much he values the service and why he would recommend us to other care providers.

If you’d like more information on how Citation can help manage your care service’s HR, Health & Safety or CQC Compliance, get in touch today on 0345 844 1111 or visit www.citation.co.uk/care.


London Care Business Briefing

Join Citation’s experts in care and other care professionals for an overview of the recent CQC changes.
The event will also include problem solving and best practice sharing amongst the other care providers in attendance.
presenters will be Mick Feather, Care Business Manager
– Tips to prepare forinspection
– New framework requirements
– 112 changes to KLOE’s and prompts
Keith Lawson Business & HR expert
– Training & managementsystems
– Contracts, handbooks &policies
– Steps to comply with fireregulation
The event will also include problem solving and best practice sharing
Entry is free but by invitation only and tickets are non-transferable. RSVP is essential.
0345 310 0650   RSVP@citation.co.uk 
Monday March the 5th – 10:00am – 12:00pm
London Marriott Hotel
County Hall, Westminster
Bridge Road, London,
SE1 7PB

The GDPR will affect all social care organisations and come into force in May 2018.Skills for Care published a series of documents and guides to help you think about what it means for your business and what you need put in place to comply:  http://www.skillsforcare.org.uk/Topics/Digital-skills/Digital-working.aspxStart with Why information collection, sharing and storage is important to get the basics about how the law is changing and why those who work in adult social care have a duty to uphold data principles.Legal implications of the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) for employersThis leaflet has been written by a solicitor to help set out your legal obligations to comply with the new GDPR regulations which come into force on 25 May 2018. Social care organisations should be in the process of considering the potential impact of GDPR on their policies, procedures and systems as budget and resources may need to be allocated.Compliance with GDPR can seem daunting, but it doesn’t need to be. It’s possible to break down GDPR compliance into bite size chunks on a risk analysis basis. Information Commissioners Office (ICO) HelplineThe ICO has launched a new helpline aimed at SMEs and charities to advise you how to be GDPR compliant by 25 May 2018. The service includes an additional, personal support feature for those that have specific questions.Call 0303 123 1113 and select option 4. 

Can healthcare organisations address their cyber crime challenges with a single cyber resilience plan?

It’s no secret that the healthcare industry is a leading target for cyber criminals. 2017 saw an exponential rise in data breaches affecting both healthcare providers and industry partners, with healthcare accounting for 25% of data breaches worldwide in the first half of the year.

See  https://www.itgovernance.co.uk/blog/can-healthcare-organisations-address-their-challenges-with-a-single-cyber-resilience-plan/?utm_source=Email&utm_medium=Macro&utm_campaign=S01&utm_content=2018-01-29&kmi=peter%40lcasforum.org

for more information and an opportunity to download a report on what actions may help.


Using Towergate for your insuarmce needs gains your organisation the following benefits

  • You have access to legal support as part of your policy to empower you and maximise your legal rights

  • You have access to a stress helpline to support you and your colleagues

  • We protect your interests by advising you regarding new tender documents

  • You can use Towergate Assist, a specialist claims recovery service for material damage claims over £5,000 who work on your behalf and not the insurers

  • We work with A-Rated insurers, Zurich and Markel to give you peace of mind

  • We have over 35 years’ experience working in the care sector so we understand the market and the challenges you face

Reducing Risk, Reducing Costs, Protecting You

As a specialist insurance broker to the care sector since 1981, Towergate Insurance understands that supporting you means more than just providing you with a policy that meets your needs. It’s just as important to help you to reduce risk in the first place, with a robust approach to risk management. Our long-term commitment to the industry has enabled us to build a detailed understanding of the evolving requirements of this unique and vital sector.

Care Trends

We have seen a trend over the last five years for care providers to be required to carry increased liability insurance limits; up to £20m in some instances. These increases will of course have cost implications which will need to be borne by providers.

Where this is not possible, our strong relationships with underwriters enable us to obtain the required limit increases with minimal additional premiums, as well as arranging for this to be split from the main policy to enable transparency of the additional costs, making recovery from the Local Authority a much simpler process.

Protecting your interests

In addition to increased policy limits we often see requests for additional clauses to be added into policy wordings, giving additional levels of protection to financial institutions as well as local authorities.

Phrases to look out for include Principals Indemnity, Co-Insured, and Composite Insured. Whilst often these are quite right and proper, on occasion, these provide greater levels of protection to such parties than is appropriate and can afford them more rights than they are due.

We therefore would always encourage you to seek advice from us in relation to new tender documents, to ensure that you are not signing up to contract clauses that would leave you exposed. Similarly, we ask our clients to pass any forms that councils request annually to us, which we can complete on their behalf to ensure they’re not signing up to contracts which put their interests at risk.

Added value

It is vital that social care providers maintain a close relationship with their insurance broker who should have a detailed understanding of the sector, in order to benefit from a greater awareness of the cover they have. This is beneficial not only around the policy wording and cover limits and restrictions, but also for better understanding of additional benefits that are provided.

For example, Towergate provide access to a team of solicitors and barristers who work exclusively for social care providers. They provide care specific legal advice, representation and indemnity and whilst the majority of their work involves employment issues, they also work on contract disputes, tax investigations and many other aspects of UK Law. This has potential for large cost saving as client’s no longer have to employ external consultants to advise them in this regard, often at additional cost.

Duty of Care

UK employers have a legal responsibility to manage stress in the workplace – see the HSE website for more details. To help with this Towergate provide clients with access to a free, confidential stress helpline. This provides a counselling service which helps employers meet their responsibilities and minimise possible employer’s liability claims for stress-related illnesses.

Towergate Insurance

Towergate Insurance is a homecare insurance specialist.  It provides a range of insurance products and proactive risk management tools that contribute towards premium savings and help businesses operate professionally and profitably.

To find out more how we can support you to minimise risk and save you money, call us on 0330 123 5154

email us: newcare@towergate.co.uk or visit www.towergateinsurance.co.uk

Towergate Insurance is a trading name of Towergate Underwriting Group Limited. Registered Office: Towergate House, Eclipse Park, Sittingbourne Road, Maidstone, Kent, ME14 3EN.  Authorised and Regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.


You are invited: Mock Employment Tribunal I 

Covent Garden, London
7 February 2018

Have you ever wondered what happens in an Employment Tribunal hearing, the process that is followed or the factors the Judge takes into account when making a decision?

Our Employment & HR team and Mind in the City, Hackney and Waltham Forest are teaming up to bring you a Mock Tribunal which will provide you with a real insight into how a claim is dealt with, the evidence that is put forward and the common mistakes that can make the difference between winning and losing.

It will be an interactive session with plenty of opportunity for you to ask questions and even have a go at some cross examination if you wish to. It will provide you with tips on preparing your case and giving evidence but also on how to handle internal processes and decision making so as to increase your chances of a successful outcome in Tribunal.

Who should attend?

  • Business owners and senior management
  • Individuals with any management responsibility for staff (including those involved in disciplinary and grievance matters)
  • HR practitioners

Agenda:

5:00 pm – Registration, welcome drinks and canapes
5:30 pm – Introduction
5:45 pm – Mock Tribunal starts
7:15 pm – Break
7:30 pm – Mock Tribunal conclusion and judgment
8:15 pm – Questions
8:30 pm – Networking drinks and canapes

We hope to see you there.

Best wishes,

Royds Withy King’s Employment & HR team.

Email: events@roydswithyking.com

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2017
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.

 


Competition and Markets Authority

Care Homes for the elderly – charging fees after death

Summary

The CMA is consulting on draft consumer law advice for UK care home providers on the charging of fees after a resident’s death.

This consultation closes at

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/care-homes-for-the-elderly-charging-fees-after-death


ACAS London have launched this workforce survey as part of their data gathering, please contribute your information

Acas London Survey

Please take a minute to complete our survey. We’d like to know what topics/issues you have coming up in 2018. This is to help us provide you with the training and guidance you need… click here for survey.

Many thanks,

Acas London


The GDPR and consent

In the second blog in our series on the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Jessica Bent, partner and co-head of the Technology, Media & Telecommunications team, and Kate Benefer, an employment partner at Royds Withy King, explore the issue of consent and the GDPR.

Consent is the easiest way to process personal data, isn’t it?

Not quite. For many years, under the Data Protection Act 1998, businesses have relied on an individual’s consent to lawfully process data, as it is often considered the “easiest” way to process personal data.

Under the GDPR, consent is one of the lawful purposes for processing data and the GDPR sets a high standard for consent to be valid. It’s not as simple as asking somebody to complete a tick box to provide their consent.

Under the GDPR, which goes further than the Data Protection Act, consent must be:

  1. Freely given
    2. Specific and informed
    3.  Unambiguous

Read our blog to learn what this means in practice and what changes to consent mean for business and HR.

We will continue our countdown to ‘GDPR day’ over the next few months. Next time, we’ll shine the spotlight on the issues around data retention and how businesses should deal with this issue.

With best wishes,
Jessica Bent and Kate Benefer

Kate Benefer

Partner
T: 01865 268 607
Email me

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2017
Royds Withy King is the trading name of Withy King LLP
Authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority – 557896
Information contained in this communication does not constitute legal advice. All statements of law are applicable to the laws of England and Wales only.


Post-Brexit immigration: certainty for EU citizens after Brexit

The UK Government has reached a deal in principle with the EU in connection with citizens’ rights.

In a joint report by the UK Government and the European Commission, the parties have confirmed that EU nationals, and their family members residing in the UK before 29 March 2019 will have the right to stay in the UK. UK citizens, and their family members residing in the European Union will enjoy reciprocal rights if they are resident in the host state before the cut-off date.

The Commission will now recommend to the European Council, the 27 national leaders, that it should sign off on the deal.

The key points

As discussed at our recent immigration seminars, the key points, subject to the final agreement, are:

  • The cut-off date
  • Citizens’ rights
  • Permanent residency/settled status documentation
  • Family members
  • The role of UK and European courts.

What are the details of agreement on each of these points?

Find out in our Business Immigration team’s latest blog.

Our Business Immigration team helps clients smoothly navigate the UK’s fast changing immigration laws and processes. We advise clients including large companies, SMEs and partnerships in sectors ranging from finance, retail, news broadcasters, art galleries, and design/architecture companies.

If you employ EU nationals, or are an EU national and would like immigration advice or advice on Permanent Residence or British citizenship, please contact Helen Murphie, Kate Benefer or Olivia Coles.

Helen Murphie

Partner
T: 020 7842 1434
Email me
Take a look at our website to find out more.

Copyright © Royds Withy King 2017

 


Top tips on how to keep on top of the HR and Health & Safety challenges this time of year can bring. Remember the potential pitfalls of the festive party season and learn how to avoid them and manage any fallout effectively.

https://www.citation.co.uk/news/hr-and-employment-law/christmas-parties-setting-stance-advance/?utm_source=partnersharing&utm_medium=web_advert&utm_campaign=Dec17

 


Firstly – a blog outlining the new consultation framework for supported housing – http://www.nationalcareforum.org.uk/viewNews.asp?news_ID=4281&sector_id=14
 
Secondly  – the information below which outlines the announcement yesterday in relation to sleep-ins. See below:-

Sleep-Ins – the next steps unveiled
Yesterday, the government announced how it plans to address the issue, following extensive lobbying and engagement with the sector. The link to the overarching announcement can be found here.

There are a number of key documents for you to review in relation to this and a number of explicit changes that it is important to take on board. This bulletin is intended for your information, and drawn from the government documents.
Headline Information 

Introduction of a new scheme entitled Social Care Compliance. The scheme is a self-review scheme, and the guidance states that if you join the scheme and declare any underpayment then you won’t have to pay the financial penalty – which is currently upto 200% of the amount you owe any worker, upto a maximum of £20K per worker. In addition, you won’t be publicly named for underpayment. If there has been a complaint by a worker against your organisation in relation to underpayment then organisations will also be contacted directly by HMRC to join the Social Care Compliance scheme. The guidance suggests that HMRC will accept employers into the social care compliance scheme if they meet the eligibility criteria and then provide them with a period of 12 months to complete a self-review – then a further three months to pay arrears for sleep in shifts. Although do note that whenever you join the scheme, the latest date for back payment of workers is the 31st March 2019.

Reinstatement of enforcement action for those who are not part of the scheme – If you do not choose to join the scheme the announcement states that there will be no further concessions and organisations will be subject to the full HMRC investigation process (whilst recognising previous announcements about exempting from prosecution sleeping time arrears generated pre July 26 2017)

No explicit support for underpayment – the current guidance provides no suggestion that local or national government will play any part in funding any eligible back pay. However, a note that further investigation with the European Commission is ongoing, and there is recognition of the pressure and liabilities on providers.
Key documents
Overview of changes
Description of the Social Care Compliance Scheme.
Link to join the Social Care Compliance Scheme.

If members have particular questions or concerns about this information, then please do contact Vic or Sharon at NCF and we will ensure that they are raised. More information about the scheme, and further briefings will be shared as they become available.

Vic Rayner, Executive Director, National Care Forum
3 The Quadrant | Coventry CV1 2DY | Tel: 024 7624 3619 | www.nationalcareforum.org.uk | @NCFCareForum
Mobile: 0771 567 1635 | @vicrayner


Government response to the House of Commons Health Committee report Brexit and health and social care – people & process

This document sets out the Government’s response to the report on the impact of Brexit on health and social care published by the House of Commons

Brexit and health and social care – people & process: Government Response to the Committee’s Eighth Report of Session 2016-17 (Cm 9469)

 


Insurance Renewal due in the New Year?

These are some of the benefits of using Towergate, a specialist in the provision of insurance services to the social care sector

  • You have access to legal support as part of your policy to empower you and maximise your legal rights

  • You have access to a stress helpline to support you and your colleagues

  • We protect your interests by advising you regarding new tender documents

  • You can use Towergate Assist, a specialist claims recovery service for material damage claims over £5,000 who work on your behalf and not the insurers

  • We work with A-Rated insurers, Zurich and Markel to give you peace of mind

  • We have over 35 years’ experience working in the care sector so we understand the market and the challenges you face

Contact Towergate for a quote and learn more of the benefits they can offer you please visit www.towergateinsurance.co.uk or call them on 0330 123 5172.

Towergate Insurance is a trading name of Towergate Underwriting Group Limited. Registered Office: Towergate House, Eclipse Park, Sittingbourne Road, Maidstone, Kent, ME14 3EN. Authorised and Regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.


Towergate Insurance, specialists in the social care and health sectors; www.towergateinsurance.co.uk  

Emergency Planning for winter  in the care industry.  Written by contributors with knowledge of social care and insurance and written with hints and tips for efficient working and how to avoid expensive issues which may have been overlooked.  It pays to regularly audit procedures and reviewing preparations as we go into winter is always a good time.

 Emergency Planning for winter

Plan to stop your business catching a cold this winter
We all love a winter wonderland but the reality of your employees struggling along icy roads to care for vulnerable people or dealing with burst pipes at your premises is far from idyllic.

Every year we, as a nation, seem unprepared for the havoc bad weather wreaks on our living and working arrangements but home care business owners can’t afford to be complacent especially with emergency services expected to be stretched to capacity.

Time spent now planning for severe weather conditions will help keep your business running smoothly and prevent costly insurance claims. Contingency planning also lets employees and service users know you care about their wellbeing at a difficult time of year.

Your premises
Flood or service failure. Freezing conditions cause a variety of problems ranging from the failure of public utilities to burst pipes and flooding which could prevent you working from your usual premises.

What you can dopreventative measures include regular servicing of utilities, dealing promptly with problems like dripping taps, making sure pipes are insulated and keeping the heating on during freezing conditions. If the worse should happen ensure you have a contingency plan that enables you to work temporarily from another location.

Insurance Tip: make sure you have appropriate business interruption cover in place and ask for input from your broker and insurer.

Slips and trips. You’re responsible for providing a safe environment for staff and visitors to your premises so do what you can to make sure they don’t slip or trip when entering or leaving.

What you can do: sign up for severe weather alerts, buy grit or salt in advance, clear snow and ice as soon as possible, establish safe access routes, use warning signs and cordon off problem areas.

Insurance Tip: document what you do – it’ll stand you in good stead in the event of a claim.

Get advice
If there’s something you’re not sure about your insurance broker should be a good resource – so use them.

Your employees
Travel problems. Ensuring your employees can reach service users can be a real headache during the winter months. Icy roads make driving more hazardous, increase journey times and put pressure on staff.

What you can do: promote good car maintenance, suggest employees keep a flask, food, warm clothing and a fully charged mobile phone in the car and make arrangements so that key staff can work from home where feasible.

Health and wellbeing: Your workforce is likely to be under increased pressure over the winter months and illness will only compound this. Unwell staff also risk the health of service users.

What you can do:  encourage your workforce to stay as healthy as possible and advertise local schemes for things like flu jabs.

Your service users
Delivering care. Older and disabled people are vulnerable to illness, slips and trips and suffer the effects of the cold acutely so it’s a cruel irony that bad weather often means it’s difficult to reach service users at the very time they need you most.

What you can do: make sure you have a plan. Identify which members of staff live most remotely and which service users are most vulnerable, then work out alternative ways to provide care should the need arise. Consider different rota scenarios, make contingency arrangements with neighbours, family members and other organisations in the area, provide staff and service users with emergency contact details and liaise with local councils to become part of their wider emergency planning process.

Insurance tip: Don’t just have a plan, communicate it, test it and review it regularly. Document everything you do and check with your broker for any implications for your insurance cover.

Provide practical advice to help keep service users warm and well by advising them to:

  • Keep living areas warm and heating adjusted to the right temperature
  • Eat well and keep hydrated – drink hot drinks and eat at least one hot meal a day
  • Wrap up warm using layers – indoors and outside
  • Draw curtains and close doors to prevent draughts
  • Wear shoes with a good grip in wet and icy conditions

Towergate Insurance is a homecare insurance specialist. They provide a range of insurance products and proactive risk management tools that help homecare businesses operate smoothly whatever the weather. For more information on how Towergate can support you, please visit www.towergateinsurance.co.uk or call them on 0330 123 5172.

Towergate Insurance is a trading name of Towergate Underwriting Group Limited. Registered Office: Towergate House, Eclipse Park, Sittingbourne Road, Maidstone, Kent, ME14 3EN. Authorised and Regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

 


 

The Competition & Markets Authority calls for urgent action in the care sector
Are your contracts compliant? 

The Competition & Markets Authority (CMA), the consumer watchdog, published the final report of its care home market study yesterday, on 30 November 2017. Two of the key themes in the report are the urgent need for funding reform and concerns about care providers using unfair contract terms.

Funding crisis

The CMA clearly identified the funding crisis in the sector, which the Government has been painfully inept at addressing, and recommended improved local authority funding and commissioning practices.

Unfair contract terms

The report highlights a number of concerns about unfair contract terms used by care providers and gives a stark warning of the need to review your care contracts now and update them if they are not compliant.

What are the key concerns raised by the CMA? What should you do now to stay compliant with consumer legislation and protect your business interests?

Click here to read our latest article in full

For more information contact

James Sage

Partner
T: 01225 730 231
Email me


Sleep-in pay crisis:
should you join HMRC’s new Social Care Compliance Scheme?

The Government’s latest response to the sleep-in pay crisis is the introduction of a new Social Care Compliance Scheme (SCCS).

Under the scheme, providers who have not paid sleep-in shifts in compliance with the National Minimum Wage can self assess their non-compliance and repay workers with protection against HMRC enforcement action.

Why has the SCCS been introduced?

The Scheme has been introduced as means of encouraging providers to refund workers for any underpayments relating to sleep-in shifts.

What do you need to know about the Scheme?

  • Joining the SCCS is voluntary.
    •  You can opt-in any time before 31 December 2018.
    •  You must return a declaration of non-compliance to HMRC within 12 months, or by 31 December (whichever is sooner).
    •  You will have a further 3 months, or until 31 March 2019 (whichever is sooner), to repay staff.
    •  You will also have to pay income tax and National Insurance contributions on the unpaid wages.
    •  HMRC’s normal enforcement procedures (200% penalties and ‘naming and shaming’) will not apply if you opt-in.

Should you opt-in and does the Scheme solve the sleep-in crisis?

Click here to read the article in full

For more information contact

James Sage

Partner
T: 01225 730 231
Email me


Report of the Competition and Markets Authority on the care home sector;

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/urgent-action-needed-across-the-uk-care-home-market

and comment on this from the Ombudsman

http://www.lgo.org.uk/information-centre/news/2017/nov/ombudsman-responds-to-cma-care-home-report


NHS England has committed to making sure 300,000 people benefit from personalised health and care through Integrated Personal Commissioning by 2018/19 and this includes 40,000 personal health budget holders.

This links may provide information of use to you

https://www.england.nhs.uk/personalised-health-and-care-framework/


Update from VODG

Following today’s Autumn Budget statement Dr Rhidian Hughes, VODG chief executive said:

“Government’s continued failure to fund social care has consequences. It means that’s unmet need is rising with devastating effects on people who rely on care services. It means that local services continue to erode and the workforce will not receive the required investment in training and skills. It means that the Care Quality Commission’s warnings about the sustainability of provision are not being acted upon. It means that additional pressures will be put on the NHS.”

https://www.vodg.org.uk/news/government-fails-to-tackle-social-care-need/


This CQC document, Driving Improvement is about changes in NHS units, however, many of the improvements came from chamges that are also relevant to social care organisations.

https://www.cqc.org.uk/sites/default/files/20170614_drivingimprovement.pdf


 

Sleep-in nights

Immigration

Updates are expected shortly with regard to these two important topics, these will be posted on this page.

If you have pressing queries about these topics, please contact

T: 01225 730100

https://www.roydswithyking.com/sectors/healthcare-social-care/


Government to set out proposals to reform care and support

First Secretary Damian Green has announced that the government will publish a green paper on care and support for older people by summer 2018.

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-to-set-out-proposals-to-reform-care-and-support


In light of CQC changes in effect from this month, we’ve produced a video outlining what’s different, and how we can help care providers with CQC compliance.

You can see the video here:

https://www.citation.co.uk/news/care/video-cqc-changes-ready/

T: 0161 667 4000

www.citation.co.uk


Important update from the Living Wage Foundation.  Many social care organisations are now using the Living Wage Foundation pay rates as an effective part of their recruitment and retention policy.

https://www.livingwage.org.uk/news


Getting ready for CQC changes
New regulations from 1 November and beyond

Following on from my article in June, CQC has now published its response to the second round of consultation on its proposals for reforming adult social care regulation.

As a result of the consultation, changes to the inspection regime will be implemented over the coming months, starting from this Wednesday.

Now that all services have been inspected and rated at least once using the ‘new’ inspection regime, CQC’s aim is to fine tune and develop the registration, monitoring, inspection and rating process.

Changes to how CQC will regulate adult social care services

  • single assessment framework for all adult social care services
  • new section on the CQC website with guidance for providers
  • improvement action plans to be submitted by providers rated ‘Requires Improvement’ in two or more consecutive inspections
  • focused inspections in addition to regular comprehensive inspections


There will be more changes from the start of 2018 and into the next financial year, all detailed in our latest article.
There will be more changes from the start of 2018 and into the next financial year, all detailed in our latest article.

Click here to read the article in full

Nicola Cutler

Associate
T: 01225 730 171
Email me


We’ve created a guide for care providers is an introduction to handing flexible working requests, which includes a link to download our free guide for further information.

There’s also links to our videos covering aspects of the guide like; Audits & Continual Improvement and Health & Safety.

Flexible working by Citation

T: 0161 667 4000

www.citation.co.uk

 


 

Towergate Insurance, specialists in the social care and health sectors; www.towergateinsurance.co.uk  
Have produced two very useful articles, Emergency Planning for winter and Marketing in the care industry.  Written by contributors with knowledge of social care and insurance and written with hints and tips for efficient working and how to avoid expensive issues which may have been overlooked.  It pays to regularly audit procedures and working through autumn is always a good time.

 Emergency Planning for winter

Plan to stop your business catching a cold this winter
We all love a winter wonderland but the reality of your employees struggling along icy roads to care for vulnerable people or dealing with burst pipes at your premises is far from idyllic.

Every year we, as a nation, seem unprepared for the havoc bad weather wreaks on our living and working arrangements but home care business owners can’t afford to be complacent especially with emergency services expected to be stretched to capacity.

Time spent now planning for severe weather conditions will help keep your business running smoothly and prevent costly insurance claims. Contingency planning also lets employees and service users know you care about their wellbeing at a difficult time of year.

Your premises
Flood or service failure. Freezing conditions cause a variety of problems ranging from the failure of public utilities to burst pipes and flooding which could prevent you working from your usual premises.

What you can dopreventative measures include regular servicing of utilities, dealing promptly with problems like dripping taps, making sure pipes are insulated and keeping the heating on during freezing conditions. If the worse should happen ensure you have a contingency plan that enables you to work temporarily from another location.

Insurance Tip: make sure you have appropriate business interruption cover in place and ask for input from your broker and insurer.

Slips and trips. You’re responsible for providing a safe environment for staff and visitors to your premises so do what you can to make sure they don’t slip or trip when entering or leaving.

What you can do: sign up for severe weather alerts, buy grit or salt in advance, clear snow and ice as soon as possible, establish safe access routes, use warning signs and cordon off problem areas.

Insurance Tip: document what you do – it’ll stand you in good stead in the event of a claim.

Your employees
Travel problems. Ensuring your employees can reach service users can be a real headache during the winter months. Icy roads make driving more hazardous, increase journey times and put pressure on staff.

What you can do: promote good car maintenance, suggest employees keep a flask, food, warm clothing and a fully charged mobile phone in the car and make arrangements so that key staff can work from home where feasible.

Health and wellbeing: Your workforce is likely to be under increased pressure over the winter months and illness will only compound this. Unwell staff also risk the health of service users.

What you can do:  encourage your workforce to stay as healthy as possible and advertise local schemes for things like flu jabs.

Your service users
Delivering care. Older and disabled people are vulnerable to illness, slips and trips and suffer the effects of the cold acutely so it’s a cruel irony that bad weather often means it’s difficult to reach service users at the very time they need you most.

What you can do: make sure you have a plan. Identify which members of staff live most remotely and which service users are most vulnerable, then work out alternative ways to provide care should the need arise. Consider different rota scenarios, make contingency arrangements with neighbours, family members and other organisations in the area, provide staff and service users with emergency contact details and liaise with local councils to become part of their wider emergency planning process.

Insurance tip: Don’t just have a plan, communicate it, test it and review it regularly. Document everything you do and check with your broker for any implications for your insurance cover.

Provide practical advice to help keep service users warm and well by advising them to:

  • Keep living areas warm and heating adjusted to the right temperature
  • Eat well and keep hydrated – drink hot drinks and eat at least one hot meal a day
  • Wrap up warm using layers – indoors and outside
  • Draw curtains and close doors to prevent draughts
  • Wear shoes with a good grip in wet and icy conditions

Get advice
If there’s something you’re not sure about your insurance broker should be a good resource – so use them.

Towergate Insurance is a homecare insurance specialist. They provide a range of insurance products and proactive risk management tools that help homecare businesses operate smoothly whatever the weather. For more information on how Towergate can support you, please visit www.towergateinsurance.co.uk or call them on 0330 123 5172.

Towergate Insurance is a trading name of Towergate Underwriting Group Limited. Registered Office: Towergate House, Eclipse Park, Sittingbourne Road, Maidstone, Kent, ME14 3EN. Authorised and Regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

 

Marketing in the care industry

The dynamics of the care industry are changing with uncertainty around future local authority funding, direct payments and privately funded care. In addition, changes in the CQC’s inspection programmes and the consumer ‘rate-your-care’ scheme all point to an industry in a state of flux. For those in the care industry, staying ahead means adapting and taking control of the future.

Taking Care of the Future; Marketing and the Care Industry
Whatever the outcome of all the care sector changes there are some certainties; there will be a much stronger consumer voice in the care that is chosen and it will be increasingly funded by individuals and their families. Care provision, in whatever form it is delivered, is often a decision made at a crisis point in a person’s life, however it is becoming more common for this decision to be planned ahead by the individual and their family. Therefore, there is a need to engage with people at all stages of their journey – from their initial considerations to their final decisions and this is where marketing will play an important part for companies.

Marketing is changing too. Customer engagement and relationship building are essential for long term business stability and growth, and this includes the care industry. Marketing communications – the way businesses communicate effectively with their future potential customers – has evolved considerably in the last couple of years and continues to do so. Having an Internet presence usually with a website and often with aspects of social media to complement printed literature, are the basics for most businesses; but as a sector, the care industry lags behind in having these marketing essentials and the knowledge or plans in place to make marketing work for them.

Time Poor
Consideration needs to be given to the demographics of ‘look who’s looking’ for care. The friends and relatives helping service users look for the right care, increasingly use the Internet to search for alternatives; the Internet is the default search medium for most people now (and the younger they are, the more this is the case); people tend to be time-poor and want to look at alternatives efficiently in order to make the next decision in their journey. Initial first impression and judgements are made when people view your presence on the Internet (or indeed, if you are not there!) and this will impact on long-term business sustainability.

In summary, the changes in the care industry will result in a need for businesses to be more ‘marketing aware’. Long term sustainability and profitability will rest with those companies who can be found on the Internet, project the right image and develop appropriate communications and relationships with their future customer base, friends and families.

Towergate Insurance is a homecare insurance specialist. They provide a range of insurance products and proactive risk management tools that help homecare businesses operate smoothly whatever the weather. For more information on how Towergate can support you, please visit www.towergateinsurance.co.uk or call them on 0330 123 5172.

Towergate Insurance is a trading name of Towergate Underwriting Group Limited. Registered Office: Towergate House, Eclipse Park, Sittingbourne Road, Maidstone, Kent, ME14 3EN.  Authorised and Regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

 

 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Immigration seminar:
What every business needs to know | November 2017

Is it relevant to your business

This seminar will be a relevant to all UK employers who do not want to fall foul of new immigration laws, particularly those who employ or want to recruit EU nationals and international talent.

We focus on employer sponsorship obligations and look at tough new penalties for illegal working.  With potential fines of up to £20,000 for each illegal worker and custodial sentences of up to five years,   it is essential that all businesses understand their obligations,  the steps they can take to protect themselves, and are up to date with new changes to the Points Based System.

We will also discuss Brexit and potential ramifications for employers with a European workforce: latest Brexit developments,  audits, and sweetners to retain staff.

London Event November 21st 2017

RWK Immigration Seminar invitation

T: 01225 730100

https://www.roydswithyking.com/sectors/healthcare-social-care/

CQC takes a firmer approach to providers caring for people with a learning disability

RWK CQC takes a firmer approach to providers caring for people with a learning disability

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We’ve created a guide for care providers with our top advice on how to achieve a great regulatory rating. It’s been written by our Care Expert Mick Feather who, before becoming part of the Citation team, inspected care providers and trained other regulatory inspectors.

There’s also links to our videos covering aspects of the guide like; Audits & Continual Improvement and Health & Safety.

Your guide to achieving a great CQC rating

T: 0161 667 4000

www.citation.co.uk

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Liability claims on the increase. Why should you care?

Liability claims have the potential to cause your business real harm. While the immediate financial cost is likely to be covered by insurance, there are other consequences including the paperwork, time involved and subsequent premium increases; not to mention the damage they can do to your reputation.

A “liability” is something for which you are legally responsible for such as the health and safety of your employees. Liability claimants in the home care sector tend to fall into two categories; employees injured at work and third parties (including service users) who are injured or have their property damaged in the course of you going about your business activities. These groups are covered under Employers’ Liability and Public Liability policies respectively.

Towergate Insurance, LCAS’s preferred insurance provider, advises why home care businesses are particularly at risk from liability claims:

It is worth noting that some liability products provide more appropriate cover for home care businesses than others, which is why it’s important to seek advice from a specialist insurance broker.

Prevention is better than cure

At the centre of every successful home care business is a content, motivated workforce. The quality of your staff and the training they receive can have a direct bearing on the reputation of your business. It can also affect the number of both Employers’ and Public Liability claims brought against you because employees that feel valued and are well-trained are less likely to make claims themselves and more likely to deliver better quality care to service users.

Accidents will happen

That said, even in the most conscientious organisations, accidents can happen. In today’s increasingly compensation-driven climate a claim is not only more likely; it can be more expensive to resolve too.

Effective management plan

Towergate Insurance suggests some strategies to help stay in control of the situation:

  1. Inform your insurer and broker as soon as possible. Some policies have strict rules about what information should be provided to whom and when.
  2. Get a grip on the evidence. Collect written details of what happened from the relevant individuals quickly because memories can fade or become confused over time.

A good witness statement can tip the balance in your favour so don’t just ask for an account of what happened; ask some probing questions so you get a complete picture of events. For instance, if an employee has slipped and injured themselves, you could ask:

  • What condition was the flooring in?
  • Was the area well lit?
  • Was there anything unusual about this incident?
  • Who was present?
  • Were there any signs of physical injury?
  • Was assistance offered? Was it accepted?
  • Were health and safety procedures followed?
  1. Get photographic evidence. This is especially important where the claim relates to a physical fault be it with a product, flooring or broken safety equipment.
  2. Put it right. Fixing a potential problem is not an admission of guilt and could help prevent future incidents.
  3. Show you care. Be as helpful and flexible as possible to an injured employee, agreeing time off for recovery and hospital appointments. Ask how they’re feeling and consider adapting their duties until they’re fully recovered. The offer of medical assistance might avoid a formal claim and usually makes for a speedier recovery. Plus, if a claim is made, compensation for time off, loss of earnings and physical suffering could be significantly reduced.

To find out more about how to prevent and handle liability claims, contact the home care specialists at Towergate Insurance on 0330 123 5172 or visit www.towergateinsurance.co.uk to find out more about what Towergate Insurance can offer you.

Towergate Insurance is a trading name of Towergate Underwriting Group Limited. Registered Office: Towergate House, Eclipse Park, Sittingbourne Road, Maidstone, Kent, ME14 3EN. Authorised and Regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

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A Skills for Care endorsed ‘Centre of Excellence’ and finalist for the Skills for Care Accolades 2016/17 ‘Best endorsed provider of learning and development’, ACC is a membership led education and learning provider, supporting outstanding approaches to learning and development in the care industry.

ACC courses, created in true partnership with our care provider membership and care industry experts, focus on sharing best practice via the power of storytelling and visual learning.

Courses are based around high definition television programmes, featuring real people and real care workers which intentionally highlight the human face of care.

All courses are supported by a wealth of learning resources that ensure best practice is embedded.

90+ courses for both residential and homecare providers, cover a wide range of subjects including:

Care Certificate – To meet the required 15 standards and deliver an effective, robust and thorough induction

Mental Health – Dementia, Depression, Bipolar and Schizophrenia

Care and Clinical – Diabetes, Stroke, Arthritis, Parkinson’s, Dysphagia, Wound care, Oral Hygiene, Bathing and Grooming

End of Life Care – Grief and Loss, Communication, Symptom Control

Risk Management – Manual Handling, Infection Control, Safeguarding, Falls Prevention, COSHH

Wellbeing – Person Centred Care, Dignity in Care, Cultural Diversity, Equality and Inclusion

Human Resources – Effective Supervision, Effective Written Documentation, Duty of Care, Teamwork, 5* Customer Service

Advanced Practice – courses for Registered Nursing staff and senior care workers including Use of Syringe Drivers, Managing Urinary Catheters, Administering Injections

Unique to the sector, ACC broadcast live courses throughout the year directly from our UK studio to our member organisations, covering a range of topics.

At the end of each live broadcast, viewers have the opportunity to speak to the course expert live in the studio, providing unprecedented access for managers and care staff to advice from recognised industry experts.

ACC’s newly launched LMS provides all the tools you’ll need to plan/record training in order to provide compliance reports for the CQC. Yet our focus is not compliance, we’re interested in quality of education to support our members to deliver outstanding care.

Please contact Raj Kumar for a no obligation presentation of ACC

Raj Kumar

rkumar@acctv.co

07534033392

http://www.acctv.co/uk/

ACC UK Head Office

Phone: 01908 318990
Email: msuk@acctv.co
12 Warren Yard, Warren Park,
Milton Keynes Buckinghamshire
MK12 5NW

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Legal advice for LCAS members

At Royds Withy King we specialise in providing expert, cost-effective advice to care providers.  Our aim is to become part of your trusted team, on hand to provide expert and practical advice when you need it.

We advise all types of care organisations including nursing and residential homes, hospices, homecare agencies, and supported living and extra care services. We act for both small operators and larger organisations. We know that one size doesn’t fit all and tailor our approach accordingly.

Our package of services includes:

  • Buying and selling care businesses
  • Recruiting and managing staff
  • CQC registration
  • Challenging CQC inspection reports, enforcement action and ratings
  • Challenging Notices of Proposal to suspend or cancel registration
  • Advice on tenders and commissioning contracts
  • Challenging local authority embargos
  • Service user contracts
  • Safeguarding investigations
  • Mental capacity, DOLS and court of protection advice
  • Property purchases, sales, leases and development of care homes and retirement villages
  • Debt recovery
  • Partnership and Shareholder Agreements

We offer LCAS members a free health-check of your employment contracts and service user contracts.

If you’d like to enquire about RWK services, please use the form below

https://www.roydswithyking.com/social-care-enquiry-form/

Or, for more information please contact:

James Sage

Partner, Head of Social Care

01225 730231

James.sage@roydswithyking.com

Hazel Phillips

Partner

01225 730166

hazel.phillips@roydswithyking.com

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A new online training tool to help protect vulnerable people from fire was launched on the 18th October following a collaboration with Learning Curve Group, TSA and London Fire Brigade.

Targeted at carers, care workers and housing providers, the course helps people recognise everything from key fire risks to how to stop a fire from starting in the first place. The tool which is free has been made possible by a £30,000 grant from London Fire Brigade.

The course takes about 60 minutes to complete and covers:

  • Warning signs such as cigarette burns in the carpets or smoking while drinking
  • Preventative measures such fitting smoke alarms where people smoke and the use of fire retardant bedding
  • The importance of referring high risk people to adult social care.

The training package is the first major grant to be awarded from London Fire Brigade’s Community Investment Fund, a one off scheme which award grants to fire prevention schemes.  The fund has seen a variety of applications from personalised sprinkler systems to fire resistant bedding. Applications for grants must be completed by the end of this month.

The free course is available at https://www.e-assessor.co.uk/cgi/radSVQ.cgi/registerTSA4

If the learner would like to go back to their course they will need to remember their login credentials from enrolment and go to the following link: https://www.e-assessor.co.uk/

 

 

 

 

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LCAS are developing partnerships with relevant organisations to bring benefits to the membership, these are listed below;

Towergate Insurance logo

Towergate work in partnership with LCAS to provide specialist insurance solutions to Care Homes and Domiciliary Care Providers in London. We know that the care industry can often be challenging, and we don’t want insurance to add to your list of challenges. Therefore, we provide you with suitable cover in addition to advice and support at every stage, so you can concentrate on the more important things, like running your care business. We work with our customers to not only deliver expert insurance services, but also advise you on how to reduce risk. What’s more, our bespoke cover and advice can ultimately drive down costs as claims are minimised; influencing the premiums charged. For more information, or to contact one of our specialist advisors, visit our website at https://www.towergateinsurance.co.uk/care-and-medical-insurance

Citation Pro Solutions Logo

LCAS have partnered with Citation to recommend them to members as a leading provider of Health & Safety, HR & Employment Law and ISO Certification support services. Whatever your struggles in these areas, Citation have the experience and the time to help.
From recruitment to contracts of employment, and investing in your staff. Working together, Citation will focus on the positive growth of your care service, meaning you’re confident when faced with visits, inspections or critique from the CQC or any other regulatory bodies.
Citation are offering a 10% discount for members who join before the end of February 2016 so contact them today on 0845 844 1111 or visit http://www.citation.co.uk/sectors/care for more information.

Top tips for managing customer reviews on My NHS

https://www.citation.co.uk/insights/my-nhs

redlinkalliance logo

Redlink Alliance are a purchasing consortium who specialise in procurement and cost management and various care associations have engaged us to develop the procurement of goods and services for their care sector. We know we can save you money without compromising existing levels of quality and service.
We can offer you a FREE health check across all the ranges of goods and services you purchase and because of our collective buying power, we are confident we can save you money across these ranges.

Have a look at our website http://www.redlinkalliance.co.uk to see the areas we can offer you. Please fill in the membership/enquiry form and send it back to us.

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